The Trifecta For Fishing Solitude

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It seems like every year it gets harder and harder for me to find complete solitude on the river. Solitude is not a necessity for me by any means, but when I’m blessed with it, I find it does wonders for purifying my soul and improving my fishing game. Time seems to stand still when I’m in complete solitude on the water. Every fish I land with no one there to confirm it but me, seems to add further reward and satisfaction. There’s no competition from other anglers, it’s just me and the fish. This allows me to open my mind, think clearly, and get in a zone to fish at my best ability. I don’t care what pace I’m fishing or how much water I cover while I’m out. I just take one fish at a time, like I’m challenging each of them to a game of chess. But to be frank, it’s not even about winning or losing. It’s more about taking in the big picture and understanding why I’m out there in the first place; I love to fly fish. Over the years I’ve developed a betting strategy I call the “Trifecta for Fishing Solitude”. Although gambling never offers us sure win bets, searching out and placing these three bets in order when possible, usually pays out plenty of solitude on the water. Bet #1. Fish off the beatin path Being lazy and choosing to fish water that’s easily accessible generally will bring you company instead of solitude in your fishing. Hiking into difficult terrain is great but you don’t always have to go that far. Sometimes all you have to do is search out stretches of water with steep banks/canyons, thick foliage or even spots where the road moves away from the stream. Fishing off the … Continue reading

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Sunday Classic / Art is Everywhere

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This weeks Sunday Classic is from Louis Cahill, reminding us Art is Everywhere. Floating the Henry’s Fork the other day I was struck by the beauty of the place.  This bank reminded me of the work of one of my favorite painters, Marc Rothko.  I doubt Rothko ever visited the Henry’s Fork, but he should have and so should you.  The fishing is as impressive as the view. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Saturday’s Shoutout / Fly Anglers Online

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This weeks Saturday Shoutout goes to Fly Anglers Online. This website is dear to my heart because I’ve been visiting it for well over a decade. I’ve learned a great deal about the sport of fly fishing and its contributed immensely to my love of fly tying. Don’t be turned off by its old school appearance. Just about every subject in fly fishing can be found on this website, but what makes this website so special are its gracious contributors. All of which solely volunteer their time and information in the effort to prosper and grow the sport of fly fishing. Take the legendary Al Campbell for example, who passed away from incurable brain cancer in 2005. He alone contributed over 150 step by step fly patterns and many articles for fly fishing and rod building. Have you ever wanted to know how to die your own fly tying materials? Looking for hundreds of step by step fly tying patterns both saltwater and freshwater? Wanting to pick the brain of legends and guides in the sport? You’ll find all of these topics and a boat load more on Fly Anglers Online. Below are some helpful links since the navigation can be tricky because of the large size of the website. Al Campbell – Articles & Fly Patterns (Step by Step) Fly Anglers Online – Article Archives Fly Of The Week – Archives 1997-2010 Fly Tying Tips  Fly Dying Tying Materials Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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No-Tech Flats Boots

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A few years ago I was fishing in the Bahamas with my friend Kirk Deeter. We stopped to get out of the boat and wade to some tailing bonefish and Kirk pulls out a pair of Converse All Stars. We grew up calling them Chucks but Kirk calls them flats boots. I couldn’t help but see the brilliance of it. Kirk explained that he bought a pair of these cheap high tops when he was headed to the salt, wore them for the week, then pitched them. Not even flying home with dirty wet boots. Smart guy. So the next time I headed to the keys I made a stop at Target where I discovered these. Converse One Stars. Important distinction, not all stars just one star. Like the one star motels I usually end up in. I bought them because they were cheap, and handy. Thirty five dollars at Target, but it turned out great. I actually like them better than the Chucks. Here’s why. Following Kirk’s lead, I planned on throwing them away at the end of the week. Kirk had explained that the Chucks were only good for that long because the metal grommets rust from exposure to salt water. The cheap One Stars have no grommets, so no rust. They also don’t have the vent holes so they don’t collect rocks and sand. At the end of my week in the Keys they still looked like new. I couldn’t see throwing them away. Well, I’ve been wading salt in them for over a year and they’re still going strong! I don’t wear them on the boat unless I’m poling. It’s important when you’re on the bow to be able to feel the line if you step on it. They are more trouble to get in and … Continue reading

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The Gink and Gasoline Fly Fishing Photography Contest

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We know from reading your comments that a lot of you are not only avid fly fishers, but also enthusiastic photographers. It’s been fun and rewarding sharing my photos with you, and we want you to share in the fun, so with help from our friends at Redington, Rio and Fishpond we are exited to announce the first ever Gink and Gasoline fly fishing photography contest! That’s right, it’s your chance to show off your mad photo skills and get some wicked gear for your trouble. How sweet is that? Here’s what’s on the table. •1st place – a pair of Redington Sonic-Pro Stocking Foot Waders •2nd place – a Fishpond Piney Creek Tech Pack •3rd place – a Rio Gold fly line   We are equally excited to have three, at the very least, semi-celebrity judges. Tim Romano In addition to being a bad ass fly fishing photographer Tim is the managing editor of Angling Trade Magazine, the photo editor of The Fly Fish Journal and blogs for Field and Stream at fsflytalk.com. When does he sleep? Paul Puckett Paul is an amazing painter who has dedicated his talents to capturing the beauty of fly fishing. He also employes his considerable visual skills in clothing design as the creative force behind The Flood Tide Co. He’s a hell of a guitarist too. Claudia Lopez One of the most talented photographers I have ever known and hands down the toughest, Claudia is a world class mountaineer and has dedicated herself to taking us ordinary humans to the most beautiful places in the world to meet the most interesting people. Seriously, you must see her work to believe it. Here’s all you need to know to get in on the action. •The contest is open to everyone except me, Kent and the … Continue reading

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Conch And Beer For Dinner Again?

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By now I’m back from the Bahamas long enough to stop grumbling about the cold but not quite long enough for the line burns to have healed. I’ve done my best to rid the world oh Conch and Kalik but if you can find any I suggest you dispose of it as soon as possible. If you need help, shoot me an email.   Here’s the recipe for the worlds best Conch Salad courtesy of the gals at Andros South. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Spotting Big Trout in all the Wrong Places

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One of my home waters that I spend 500 plus hours a year guiding on is notorious for big fish holding in water that most people would consider horrible trout water. I’m talking about water that is less than a foot deep that even veteran anglers would regularly walk by without fishing. The other day guiding I spotted a huge hooked jaw male rainbow pushing 30 inches. It was sitting in plain view on a gravel bar in six inches of water hugged up against the edge of a rhododendron. My partner and I watched the fish feeding regularly for about five minutes, while we planned out our spot and stock. I had seen big fish laying in this shallow gravel bar in the past many times, but nothing this size. Here’s the ironic part, right before we had approached the spot I had just explained how important it was to scan the water, even ridiculous looking shallow water before making a cast in the chances we might spot a big fish. Heavily pressured fish are smart and often sneaky. I truly believe big trout will often search out under pressured water that anglers tend to overlook to stay off the radar. Doing this keeps them from getting harassed by 90% of fly fishermen. Next time your fishing heavily pressured trout water that holds big fish and the water is clear enough to sight-fish, don’t make the mistake of overlooking subpar trout water on the way to your next honey hole. You may very well end up spotting a trout of a lifetime. Just because you’ve fished a spot several times with no luck, doesn’t mean it will never hold fish. Ask any veteran guide, and I’m sure they’ll tell you stories about telling their clients, “Let’s walk through this water and … Continue reading

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Browns On The Move

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Fall through winter is a busy time of year for trout. Water temperatures are falling, days are getting shorter and big fish are on the move. Among the species that spawn in the fall are Brown Trout. The cooling weather and longer nights are their cue to leave the deep pools, reservoirs and under cut banks they call home and head to the shallow gravel runs where they spawn. This annual migration offers anglers a rare shot at fish we would normally never see. Browns are one of the most sought after species of trout. Primarily because they are so difficult to catch. They are moody and reclusive, the larger fish spending most of their days hidden by overhead cover. They do their feeding at night, hunting down bait fish and crawfish in the shallows then disappearing at dawn. They are homebodies. Browns will often spend their whole life in one pool where they have found refuge. Research has shown that they set such a high value on this kind of safety that some Brown Trout, faced with lethally high water temperatures, will stay in their hiding places and die, rather than leave to find cooler water. That stubbornness is exactly what makes them so difficult to catch. Targeting moving fish is a lot of work. You have to cover water, but you have to do your homework too. The first step is knowing where the fish live. This is usually pretty easy. It’s hard to keep big Browns a secret. The reservoirs and rivers where folks catch the occasional big brown generally hold lots of fish of that size. The next step is a little tougher. You have to figure out where they spawn. Fish will move upstream, drawn to the spot where they were born, to lay their … Continue reading

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Sunday Classic / Tips For Netting Big Fish from a Drift Boat

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So you’re floating the river in a drift boat and your buddy just hooked into a trophy trout. What should you do next to ensure you land that trophy? Below are three tips for increasing your chances at netting that fish of a lifetime. 1. When the opportunity presents itself get all your fly line on the reel. After you’ve set the hook, made a few strips to keep tension, and your jaw has dropped to the ground after seeing the giant beast at the end of your line, your next objective will be to find a good time to get all that excess fly line onto the reel. The last thing you want is the trophy fish making a blistering run, and your excess fly line catching on your boot, thigh brace, or rod butt resulting in a break off. When the trophy settles down and holds in a stationary position during the fight, this is when you should take the opportunity to reel in and get all of your fly line on the reel. Doing so you can let that $300 fly reel with a butter smooth drag to do its job. 2. Use your drift boat to block danger zones during the fight. Don’t keep your boat anchored up during a battle with a trophy fish expecting the angler to do all the work. Often the trophy will make a big run downstream or upstream, which will drastically lower the ability of the angler to control the fish. If you’re on the oars, it’s your job to row the boat and follow the fish to help keep that perpendicular fight. Look for danger zones like snags and boulders that the trophy can break you off on. If the fish starts to make a move towards one of … Continue reading

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Saturday’s Shoutout / MidCurrent, Ask the Experts

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This weeks Saturday’s Shoutout goes to MidCurrent, for its Ask the Experts section. Anyone that surfs the web and also fly fishes has probably heard of Midcurrent. I try to visit the site at least once a week over a cup of coffee to read the latest content. It’s always well written and very informative. With hundreds upon hundreds of web pages dedicated to fly fishing on the MidCurrent website, it’s no doubt the Google of Fly Fishing. I personally enjoy the Ask the Experts section of the website, that takes questions from followers and is then answered by professionals in the industry. That’s information you can count on being accurate and worth your time to read, and we encourage you to check out. Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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