Metal Studs Aren’t Just Good For Traction in Water

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I’ve just found another reason why I love my metal studded wading boots. They work great for climbing trees and retrieving my clients flies. I also just found out I’ve officially become a fat ass, and that branch I was grabbing onto was a poison ivy vine. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Standing in the River Carrying a Torch

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Standing in the River Carrying a Torch A different kind of love story. Men and fish parted ways a long time ago. You couldn’t call it an amiable divorce. The fish got everything. The mountain streams, the lazy winding rivers, the deep blue sea, everything. Men had to pack their bags and crawl, with their heads hanging, out onto the land and they were not happy about it. They learned to breathe air and walk on two legs but they never stopped dreaming of swimming in the dark oceans, nor of the long and lovely fish that had sent them packing. They thought about fish all the time. They made their homes near the water and lurked around the shore, peering into the depths. Men wondered if the fish ever thought about them. Probably not. They saw fish from time to time, sliding gracefully through a pool or leaping a waterfall. They seemed happy. They seemed to have moved on, forgotten about men altogether. Men knew they should be happy for the fish, but they weren’t. They were bitter and moody and often cried at night. Men invented alcohol and that helped. It didn’t take their mind off of fish but liquor is a good listener and it doesn’t judge or mind if you cry. “Who needs fish, Fuck ’em”, men decided. They turned their back on the water and went to the woods and found animals and for a while it took their mind off of things. They stalked and chased and laid in wait and for a while the pretty little deer were fun, but in time those big black eyes just seemed empty. Men had nothing to talk to deer about. Try to explain to deer about the ocean, about gliding through the waves, your body taut … Continue reading

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Sunday Classic / Tory’s Mellow Cast

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The notorious Tory Bevins, bonefish guide at Andros South, has his own way of doing things. And it usually works. I have the utmost respect for these Bahamian guides. They are self made fly fishers and as perfectly adapted to their environment as the fish they pursue. Tory’s mellow cast cuts the wind like a bullet. Let bonefish guide Tory Bevins teach you to cast to Bob Marly. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Saturday Shoutout / 3 Big Names

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It’s kind of been a big week for fly fishing sites. There’s too much great stuff hot off the virtual press to cover in one post but here are three that will keep you plenty busy. Southern Culture on the Fly, SCOF to it’s friends, has it’s second issue out. Southern Fly Fishers are a unique bunch so it’s fitting that SCOF would be one of the freshest voices in The Fly Fishing Media. Hats off to our southern brothers in arms. SCOF is a great read. Kent and I are proud to be featured. Bloodknot Magazine is in good standing and likely needs no introduction. The new issue is of particular interest as it focuses on fly fishing blogs. There is some great content by some truly creative fisher folk. Again, I’m proud to be included. Anglers Tonic has long been one of my favorite sites. Greg Thomas, also at the wheel of Fly Rod and Reel as editor, offers up a tonic of fishing lifestyle on and off the water. Greg is a great writer and photographer and always has his finger on the pulse of the industry. Anglers Tonic has just been redesigned with the goal of making it livelier and more spontaneous. I liked it before, I love it now!   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Korkers SnowJack Boot Review

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The first impression I got pulling the SnowJack out of the box, is these boots were like extreme foot armor. They were boots you would want to strap on to make your last stand in, reach the top of a ambitious summit, or go into a lengthy battle with. The SnowJack boot brings a whole new meaning to the phrase, “Built like a brick shithouse”. In fact, it looks pretty clear to me that the designers at Korkers did everything in their power to make sure the SnowJack will outlive you. I’m being for real here. I thoroughly examined the boot and there’s nothing on it that has subpar quality. The best way two understand what I’m talking about, is breaking the SnowJack down into two parts. The lower half of the boot is built with an ironclad design that’s ready to chew up and spit out whatever terrain you throw at it, while the upper half of the boot is fitted with a waterproof / breathable leather bootie that’s tough, yet flexible enough to keep you nimble and mobile. This two part working team design gives you ultimate protection an durability without jeopardizing the boots functionality in the field. Even if you somehow manage to where out the soles, don’t get your panties in a wad. You can simply replace the sole for $24.99 and you’ll be good as new, ready for the next thousand miles of adventure. Heck, I forgot to mention Korkers already provides you with two Omnitrax soles with your purchase. You’ll get an aggressive rubber lug sole, and the IceTrax sole with both carbide studs and rubber lugs. As you can see, it’s going to be a very long time before you have to worry about purchasing new soles, and you’ll be ready to quickly change … Continue reading

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Awesome Fly Fishing Photography, Get Some!

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This image and many others could be yours! If your not aware of the Colorado Greenbacks, you should be. I’m not talking about the beautiful and delicate native cutthroat, rather the enthusiastic group of anglers dedicated to saving them for the future. The Greenbacks are a sort of subchapter of Trout Unlimited. A group of young and energetic anglers that have grown tired of business as usual and taken off in their own vibrant direction. These guys are the future of TU, if not the future of Fly Fishing on the whole. On February 2nd the Greenbacks are are throwing a party. The second annual Surface Film fly fishing photography show. Prints will be on display, and for sale, from the best fly fishing photographers in the biz. I’m honored to be on the list. There will be eating and drinking and music and all the cash goes to conserving the wild trout water of Colorado, which is a national treasure. If you never fished Colorado get off your ass and get to it! It’s amazing, and it belongs to all of us not just the good people of Colorado. So please support the Greenbacks. The fish and the guys working so hard to protect them.   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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2 Alternatives for Attaching Your Split-Shot

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You’ve been fishing hard all day long searching for that perfect honey hole. You know the one I’m talking about, it’s the one that holds that trophy trout that keeps haunting you in your dreams. It’s getting late, your tired, and you know you should be heading back, but there’s a bend just up ahead, and your curiosity keeps pushes you forward with those powerful words, “This could be it, just see what’s on the other side”. Sure enough, as you round the corner you lay your eyes on a picture perfect run, offering everything a trophy trout could desire. You get into position, make the cast, mend your line, and begin following your strike indicator with your rod tip, when out of now where, it shoots under the surface like it was just attached to a iron dumb bell. You set the hook and feel the heavy weight of the fish thrashing its big head, and you’re immediately on cloud 9. The adrenaline rush doesn’t last long though. It’s quickly replaced by painful heart ache when you feel your tippet snap, and watch your rod go straight. The excitement is all over…, you won’t land that trophy fish or even be graced with a quick glimpse of it for that matter. The only memory you’ll have to remember that trophy trout by is the few aggressive head shakes. You bring your fly-less rig to hand and find the tippet broke at the split-shot. Has this ever happened to you before? If you attach your split shot too tight on your tippet it can weaken its strength significantly. Most anglers try to avoid this by tying a triple surgeon’s or blood knot above their tandem nymph rig, and attach the split-shot above that. The knot keeps the split-shot from sliding … Continue reading

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Joel vs The Shark

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My good friend Joel Dickey was not raised by wolves, but you might not believe it if you’ve ever seen him angry. With hair the color of a new penny and bright blue eyes that can be uncomfortably intense at times, the ruddy sun scorched complexion of a Bedouin, the build of a boxer and two gold hoops, one in each ear, Joel looks half Viking, half pirate. Born of a long line of Tennessee moonshiners and snake handlers, he has a great southern brogue that’s so deep you can hear the chicken frying when he talks. He has a heart as big as the Florida sky, and a temper to match. He caught his first rattle snake at age six. Joel has no fear. Fear is an important emotion. As humans, our fight or flight response has served us well, in evolutionary terms. Joel somehow missed out on the flight part of that, as well as the fear. He’s all fight. Any other person finding themselves face to face with a fifteen foot hammerhead shark might back down. Joel on the other hand… The heat there in the Florida Keys that day had been like penance. So had the fishing. It was a perfect day for tarpon. The weather was hot with just a little wind, not a cloud in sight. It was mid May. The peak of the season. The tarpon that had been everywhere just a few days before had vanished. The few we saw had no interest in a fly. This was exactly what we had been waiting for. There was a huge falling tide in the evening and it had been unseasonably warm. We had been looking at the calendar and the tide apps on our phones for six months thinking that this was the … Continue reading

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Covering a Hatch Starts with Carrying the Right Flies

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Have you ever been standing in the river watching a big hatch unfolding with rising fish all around you, but for some reason you can’t get the feeding fish to eat your flies? Covering and owning a hatch starts with you first carrying the right fly patterns. When you know you’re going to encounter a specific hatch on the water, always carry multiple variations (colors, sizes) and stages (nymph, emerger, dun, spinner) to make sure you’re covered. Trout can get really picky during selective feeding. This very situation happened to me last year running a guided float trip during an intense sulphur hatch. There was yellow everywhere, and fish were in a feeding frenzy, but the trout wouldn’t eat any of my sulphur patterns I tied on for my clients. Even my CDC go-to patterns that always work, were shunned by the feeding trout. I finally found a sulphur pattern after my seventh try that the trout consistently liked, and it saved the day. It ended up being nothing special, just a dun with in a slightly different color shade. The remainder of the float trip all I could think about was how important it was that I had so many different sulphur imitations on hand. It would have been a long quiet drive back if my clients witnessed an epic hatch with perfect conditions, and we ended up striking out on the water. Your standard parahcute style dun with a small nymph dropper off the back will not always work. Below are some examples of other fly pattern options for rounding out your fly box and owning a hatch: Drys Parachute Style (with and without trailing shuck) Traditional Style (palmered hackle) Thorax Style (Palmered Hackle with hackle trimmed off on the bottom so pattern rides low on the water) … Continue reading

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Sunday’s Classic / How To Make Your Fly Rod Cast Like A Dream

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What Fly Line Matches Up Best With Your Fly Rod? It always amazes me that there’s very little talk in the industry about how important it is to match your fly rod with the appropriate fly line. My recent visit to the ITFD Fly Fishing Show in New Orleans, I witnessed on more than one occasion, fly rod company’s matching their fly rods up with what appeared to be the wrong fly lines. If you spool up the wrong fly line on your reel, that $700 fly rod you just purchased will end up feeling awkward, and won’t perform the way the fly rod designer intended it to. Below are some quick tips on how to match your fly rod with the correct fly line so it ends up casting like a dream. Fast Action Fly Rods Stiff, fast action fly rods require fly lines with a more aggressive head design for optimum rod loading and casting. Since fly rods are generally meant to load at 25-30′ of fly line out the end of the rod tip, anglers often find it difficult to load fast action fly rods, particularly at short distances, unless they’ve matched their rod with the appropriate fly line. Both Rio and Scientific Anglers manufacture fly lines specifically for fast action rods. Try Weight Forward (WF) Rio Grande Fly Line or WF GPX Scientific Anglers. These two fly lines in laymen terms, are about 1/2 weight heavier than traditional fly lines by AFTMA standards. Pairing up one of these fly lines with your fast action fly rod will allow you to load your rod with less effort and it will perform much better at all casting distances. Medium Action Fly Rods Medium action fly rods call for fly lines with a more conservative and well rounded tapered design. Loading … Continue reading

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