Use Side Pressure To Avoid Breaking Off On Snags

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You’ve got a big fish on and it’s making a screaming run straight for a big snag on the far bank. What should you do to decrease your chances of breaking off? Your best bet is to apply low side pressure with your rod while keeping a perpendicular position between you and the fish at all times. Doing so you can put twice as much pressure on the fish than you normally can when your fly rod is in the overhead fighting position. Secondly, it’s much easier for you to steer the fish’s head and turn its direction using low side pressure. Always follow the fish up and down the river during the fight. The closer you stay to the fish the more leverage and power you can apply to steer and control the fish. Lastly, don’t tighten down on the fish trying to stop its run towards a snag, because nine times out of ten you’ll end up breaking the fish off. The harder you pull on a big fish the harder it generally going to pull back. If you find playing the fish aggressively makes the fish fight harder and more difficult to control, try backing off on your power and playing the fish more gently. Sometimes doing this will calm the fish down enough to gain control and win the battle. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com 

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You Brought a Rain Coat, Right?

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Better put it on, and rain pants, and a hat, and, hell just put your waders on! Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

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Mr President, You are Officially Invited to Go Fishing

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You buy the gas, I’ll buy the beer! Thanks, Moldy Chum for finding this great photo.

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Get Your Hike On For Wild Trout

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It’s August and it’s safe to say that we’re in the dog days of summer. Fishing conditions are tough and the only really good fishing for trout right now is the first and last couple hours of the day. Do what I do this time of year and get your hike on for wild trout on high elevation tributaries. They maintain colder water temperatures because they’re closer to the source of the springs, and since the water temperatures are cooler the fish will feed for longer periods of the day. Yeah, you’re probably not going to catch any giants, but what you will catch will be wild and colored up. Fly fishing remote hike-in trout streams can be some of the most rewarding fly fishing and allow you to get away from the crowds. The best thing about high elevation trout streams during the summer months is that you can almost always get away with strictly fishing dry flies. Pack your fly box with elk hair caddis, stimulators, and parachute adams and you should be good. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com       

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Beat the Heat

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With the worst heat wave in recent memory in full swing, wouldn’t this feel good right about now? Murphy  Kane of Bent Rod Media, caught taking a break form some epic steelheading last December.  We fished for a week and the warmest it got was 14 degrees.  Ain’t global warming grand? We didn’t just play in the snow.     Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com  

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Tandem Streamer Rigs Catch More Trout

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Louis Cahill with a nice Roaring Fork Brown Trout fishing a Tandem Streamer Rig. There’s no doubt that Louis and I are both hardcore streamer junkies. We never leave home without our streamer boxes packed full. One thing we do a little different from some streamer fishermen on the water is fish a streamer dropper rig. Quite often we’ll tie on a nymph dropper off the back of our big gaudy streamer to increase hookups. Big fish are smart, especially during the busy season when their getting pressured, and they can sometimes get a little gun shy eating big streamers. If you’re on the water and you’re getting a bunch of chases or short strikes on your streamer, try tying on a dropper nymph. It will serve two purposes. First, it will be less intimiating to spooky trout. Secondly, it will often tempt a trout to eat that has turned off your streamer at the last second. Case in point, last year Louis and I were on the Madison River streamer fishing with very little luck. Instead of giving up on the streamer bite, Louis tied on a size 10 golden stonefly nymph dropper and began putting on a clinic. Every fish ate the golden stone like it was candy and he brought numerous twenty plus inch fish to the boat that day. Experiment with tandem streamer rigs on the water. You don’t have to just use a nymph dropper either. You can also try trailing a smaller streamer behind or even fish two streamers with contrasting colors. Multiple flies are usually better than one.   Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

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Your GPS Might Be Trying To Kill You

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I’ve said a hundred times that my iPhone will be the death of me. I always thought it would end with me texting while driving ninety five miles an hour. But apparently Hal has something more sinister up his sleeve.

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Fly Fishing Alpine Lakes

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Fly Fishing on alpine lakes for trout has become one of my favorite ways to spend a day on the water. There’s something really special about making long accurate casts to rising trout on the move. It’s very much a team effort between the fly angler and the oarsman. Often you can’t just sit in one spot and expect to get shots at rising trout. More times than not the oarsman has to stealthily row along with the cruising fish, pacing himself with the trout and their heading, so the angler can make a pin point cast just ahead of the trout. Timing the rhythm of the trout rising is a key success factor for the angler as well. Get on the water early for the best dry fly fishing. Once the sun gets up high in the horizon most of the trout will stop feeding on top and move to deeper water. They do this for two reasons. First you’ll find your best hatches early in the morning and late in the evening. Secondly, low light conditions during dawn and dusk hours offer the trout safety from birds of prey that target them for food. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

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Ink for the Gink

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One of my favorite fly fishing tattoos. Zack Dalton, of Rio, has no problem committing to his home water in Idaho. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

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3 Tips For Netting Trophy Trout From a Drift Boat

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So you’re floating the river in a drift boat and your buddy just hooked into a trophy trout. What should you do next to ensure you land that trophy? Below are three tips for increasing your chances at netting that fish of a lifetime. 1. When the opportunity presents itself get all your fly line on the reel. After you’ve set the hook, made a few strips to keep tension, and your jaw has dropped to the ground after seeing the giant beast at the end of your line, your next objective will be to find a good time to get all that excess fly line onto the reel. The last thing you want is the trophy fish making a blistering run, and your excess fly line catching on your boot, thigh brace, or rod butt resulting in a break off. When the trophy settles down and holds in a stationary position during the fight, this is when you should take the opportunity to reel in and get all of your fly line on the reel. Doing so you can let that $300 fly reel with a butter smooth drag to do its job. 2. Use your drift boat to block danger zones during the fight. Don’t keep your boat anchored up during a battle with a trophy fish expecting the angler to do all the work. Often the trophy will make a big run downstream or upstream, which will drastically lower the ability of the angler to control the fish. If you’re on the oars, it’s your job to row the boat and follow the fish to help keep that perpendicular fight. Look for danger zones like snags and boulders that the trophy can break you off on. If the fish starts to make a move towards one of … Continue reading

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