Fish Boy Is Sorry

10 comments / Posted on / by

A quick heads up, this story contains some adult language and ideas. I was fishing a little mountain lake with my buddy Dan when he told me, “the last time I fished this place I was on a date”. “Why the hell did you bring a date up here”, I asked. “Well”, he said, “things were getting kind of serious and I thought I should show her what she was signing up for”. “So you took her fishing”? I laughed, “you should have locked her in your apartment and disappeared for three days, then showed back up stinking and drunk, that’s what she’s signing up for”! Fly fishing has developed it’s own culture and it’s own code of misconduct. It reorients priorities and skews a person’s perspective of what “normal people” will tolerate. For some guys it’s like Mardi Gras. A fishing trip is an excuse to blow off the steam they build up at work or home and then they’re back to normal. For others it becomes a life style choice. For some an occupation. Living with a fisherman has got to be tough. I know my wife puts up with a lot from me and, to her credit, does it cheerfully. However, if you talk to any hard core angler it’s not uncommon to find a long list of ex-wives and girlfriends who just couldn’t, or wouldn’t take it anymore. Fishing, like any other addiction, complicates relationships. Many of my best friends have made big life decisions base purely on fishing. Uprooted their families and moved across country without jobs or left their families alone for months at a time to guide in some far flung location. I have a friend who commutes over fifteen-hundred miles between his family and the water he guides year round. I know … Continue reading

Read More »

Sunday Classic / Your GPS Might Be Trying To Kill You

2 comments / Posted on / by

I’ve said a hundred times that my iPhone will be the death of me. I always thought it would end with me texting while driving ninety five miles an hour. But apparently Hal has something more sinister up his sleeve. NPR reports that more and more people who have become over reliant on their GPS systems are getting lost in dangerous remote places. At least one person has died in California’s Death Valley after being stuck on an abandoned mining road for five days. A check with the mapping company revealed over one hundred fifty nonexistent roads on the GPS software. This has happened to me, thankfully not in Death Valley. It’s easy to get dependent on our gadgets and with more folks on the water than ever we’re all going further out of our way to fish. It’s fun to explore and find a new spot. It sucks to die of exposure. So take along a good map if you’re blazing new trails or just leave a trail of beer cans. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

Read More »

Saturday Shoutout / Three Worth A Read

No comments yet / Posted on / by

Here are 3 articles worth your time. Chards Choker Permit Fly! Friend of the Gink Bruce Chard is now Blogging for Fly Fisherman Magazine. If you’re looking to improve your game in the salt, he is a must read. Rogue Angles / Don’t Go Where People Don’t Want You! The Angles are doing a great job on all things related to the Pebble Mine disaster. Thanks Ladies! Anglers Tonic / Skate ‘Dat Fly! Sage wisdom from steelhead ninja Greg Thomas. HiiiiiiiiYa!

Read More »

The First Ten Seconds

3 comments / Posted on / by

Chaos and panic are good words to describe what goes through many anglers heads during the first ten seconds following a big fish hookup. The decisions you make during those first seconds of the fight will often determine whether you or the fish wins the battle. There’s lots of ways to lose a big fish and sometimes it’s completely out of your control. But one of the worst decisions you can make, specifically when a fish is making a screaming run upstream or downstream of you, is deciding to stay put and not follow. When this happens you better be ready to kick it into high gear and move your ass fast in pursuit. Otherwise, you’ll quickly find yourself with no leverage to apply adequate power to fight and steer the fish. It’s like trying to drive a car on a curvy road without a steering wheel, it’s just not going to work. Big trout usually only have a couple really long hard runs. If you can stick with them during the blitzing runs and keep good tension, you’ll often find the hardest part of the fight is over with. After that it’s all about being patient and smart until you can bring the fish into the net. Most big fish are lost within the first ten seconds of the fight. Be smart and make the right decisions during those critical moments. That way you can claim victorious in the end. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   

Read More »

Ink For The Gink

No comments yet / Posted on / by

   Superguide, Andrew Grillos is half way to his slam in this photo.  Andrew has some truly awesome tats. I’m especially fond of the rainbow. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com  

Read More »

Nymph Patterns for Dingy Water

No comments yet / Posted on / by

I’ve been on the water many days trout fishing when I’ve had blue bird skies overhead and gin clear water. Then moments later without any warning, an isolated thunderstorm rolls in and dumps a ton of rain, turning that crystal clear water cloudy. When you find yourself trout fishing in dingy or stained water conditions (not referring to blown out conditions) try using nymphs with fluorescent hot beads or patterns with hot spots to increase your number of hookups. They create bright focal points that allow trout to spot them easier when water clarity is subpar. When I’m dealt this hand of cards on the river I’ll tie on a large profile lead fly like a woolly bugger or rubberleg stonefly imitation followed up with one of these flies below as a dropper in my tandem nymph rig. 1. Dave Hise’s Hetero-Genius Nymph  2. Hot Bead Soft-Hackle  3. Hot Head Pheasant Tail  4. Hot Head Buzzer Midge Attractor  5. Hot Butt Hexagenia Nymph Another situation when these patterns really shine is fishing them during the colder months of the year. When water temperatures drop into the 30s and 40s, trout can often become lethargic due to their low metabolism rate. Fishing flies that have hot focal points can snap the trout out of their trance and create reaction bites. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

Read More »

Trust The Boo

2 comments / Posted on / by

I’ve fished bamboo rods my whole life and I’ve made my own for the last twelve years or so. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked if I was afraid to fight big fish on a bamboo rod. The answer is no. I’ve broken my share of rods but only once did I break one fighting a fish and that was totally my fault. I’ve landed more fish over twenty inches on bamboo than I can count, a few pushing thirty. The two fish pictured were both landed on a seven foot four weight. The tip on that rod measures only thirty thousandths of an inch in diameter but it handled those monsters just fine. A 27″ Hen and a 28″ Male Both Landed on the 4 Weight Bamboo is a remarkable material. When properly heat treated it has amazing strength. Traditional Japanese carpenters use bamboo nails cooked in a wok and high rise construction all over Asia is done on bamboo scaffolding. Do bamboo rods break? Of course they do but a well made rod is much stronger than you would guess and if properly handled and cared for it will take whatever a fish can dish out. I’ve heard it said that fisherman break rods, not fish, and I think that’s true. With that in mind, here are some tips on how to keep that cane rod fishing for many years. • Treat it right. Bamboo doesn’t take a lot of maintenance but there are some things you should think about. Rot is a death sentence for a cane rod. Rod makers spend a lot of time on their finish and it can last a lifetime but it’s not bulletproof. Never put a rod away wet. This is the most common mistake guys make with … Continue reading

Read More »

Wiggle Bug For Silver Salmon

11 comments / Posted on / by

Who doesn’t love watching a big silver salmon rushing towards a fly and crushing it? I’ll tell you who, an Alaskan guide who’s already unhooked three dozen of them for the day. I used to really enjoy guiding first time silver clients in Alaska. You wouldn’t believe the praises you’d get as a guide after they landed twenty or so. It was sometimes hard keeping a straight face, smiling and saying, thanks man! But in my head I’m thinking, it’s not brain surgery, this is about as easy as Alaska fishing gets. Seriously though, I really did enjoy the high fives and genuine remarks I received during those trips. Silver fishing did get a little monotonous at times but it was always an easy day of guiding, something guides cherish after months in the bush. Silver salmon are super territorial and aggressive during the spawn, making them eager to chase and attack flies that enter their field of vision. It’s not technical fly fishing by any means but a lot of fun for fly anglers wanting action all day long. The only thing I truly hated about silver salmon fishing was the beating my hands took from trying to handle them death rolling in the net. If you ever get a chance take a good hard look at an alaskan guides hands. It’s not a pretty sight. I never thought my hands would look the same after that season in Alaska. Thank God for utter cream. When you’re guiding silvers its more important that you find the fish than how much skill your clients have. LOFT really doesn’t play as much of a role in success like it does for other species. When you locate fifty to a hundred fish your virtually guaranteed to get bites, and if you don’t, … Continue reading

Read More »

Sunday Classic / Tips For Spooky Trout

2 comments / Posted on / by

When the Going Gets Spooky : Photos Louis Cahill Do you ever find yourself sight fishing to trout in big flats on the river? It’s as clear as water can get, and as flat and calm as can be. There are plenty of visible trout but they’re super spooky. What can you do to increase your odds at catching trout in these situations? Try these six tips that should stack the odds in your favor. 1. Use a long and fine leader. Your standard 9′ leader isn’t going to do the job in most instances. You are better off going with a 12′ leader, or even longer in some cases, that will allow you to lay out your fly with a super soft presentation. The longer leader will also help keep your fly line out of view from the ultra observant trout. Selecting a specialty dry fly leader that’s supple, and not stiff will aslo help you get a better drag free drift when dealing with intricate water currents. On a side note, you should do away with your fluorescent orange fly line, instead spool up your reel with a more natural and subtle fly line color like olive or grey. 2. Downsize your Tippet When you are dealing with crystal clear water conditions and spooky trout, you should not hesitate to downsize your tippet. I personally wouldn’t start out using anything lighter than 6x tippet on flat, clear water. If you get refusals from the trout, or if you’re using super small fly patterns sizes 22 or smaller, you had also better be prepared to breakout those tippet spools of 7x and 8x. It’s very important to match the tippet size with the size of the fly in order to get a more natural drift with your fly. 3. … Continue reading

Read More »

Saturday Shoutout / Finpusher

4 comments / Posted on / by

Here’s a great article of faith by Finpusher A Few I Try To Live By

Read More »