Playground Earth Relay Episode #3 – Fly Fishing Owyhee River

24 comments / Posted on / by

Check Out Playground Earth All-Terrain Relay Episode #3 Video - Fly Fishing Owyhee River

Louis and I are proud to showcase with all of you today Episode #3 of the Playground Earth All-Terrain Relay sponsored by BFGoodrich, which documents an epic off-roading and fly fishing adventure to the Owyhee River in Oregon for trophy brown trout.

We couldn’t be happier with the final cut and we hope all of you thoroughly enjoy watching the brilliant work created by Camp 4 Collective. First, we’d like to thank BFGoodrich and The Martin Agency who believed in us and allowed us to participate in this once in a life-time opportunity. We’d also like to thank Camp 4 Collective for making us look top notch and Rob Parkins, our Lead Location Scout, who put in countless hours of his time to make sure our relay was a success. We couldn’t have pulled it off without these great partners.

Read More »

Keep It Clean, With A Clearing Cast

No comments yet / Posted on / by

I’ve heard salt water fly fishing described as long periods of boredom punctuated by brief periods of panic.

I don’t know that I find staring at miles of gorgeous flats boring but I’ve felt that panic a time or two. It’s a stalking game and when the fish show up, shit happens fast. You often only get one shot and the last thing you need is a line maintenance issue. That’s why you need to make a clearing cast.

Start by striping as much line as you can cast off of your reel on to the deck. Because the line you are pulling off of the reel stacks on top of the line coming form the guides, when you try to cast you will be shooting line from the bottom of the pile and it will tangle every time. Like in the photo above. Not what you want when your casting to a fish and certainly not once you’ve fed one. So before you

Read More »

My Most Memorable Bonefish

4 comments / Posted on / by

sn’t it funny, how certain fish we catch during our fly fishing trips can end up providing us with ten times the satisfaction over all the others. Sometimes, the size of our catch has little at all to do with the amount of reward it brings. I love catching big fish just as much as the next guy, but for me at least, it’s often more about overcoming the challenges along the way that’s what really makes one catch end up standing out amongst all the rest.

For example, my most memorable bonefish to date, only weighed around four pounds. I’ve landed much larger bones over the years, but what made this particular bonefish so special to me, were the extremely difficult fly fishing conditions I had to work through to hook and land it. Before it all unfolded, and I found myself feeling that special fish tugging on the end of my line, I was holding onto the last remaining tidbits of hope I had left inside me for dear life. I thought success was just about impossible. Never give up when you’re out fly fishing. For when you succeed when everything is stacked up against you, it will be invigorating to your very core.

Read More »

New Rio Freshwater Fly Lines: Video

No comments yet / Posted on / by

RIO has a couple great new technical fly lines for freshwater anglers.

This year’s freshwater offerings from RIO are all about the technical anglers. The new Technical Trout line is designed for fishing long leaders to picky fish. There’s some very cool stuff for stillwater anglers too, including a sweep line. Uncommon in the US these lines are amazing searching tools for lake anglers. Simon Gawesworth explains how they work.

WATCH THE VIDEO FOR ALL THE DETAILS ON NEW RIO FRESHWATER FLY LINES.

Read More »

Stretch Thy Fly Line

22 comments / Posted on / by

Are you looking for more a little more distance in your fly cast? Is your fly line not shooting through your guides as easy as it should? Is it lacking that fresh from the box high floating buoyancy? Are you spending more time untangling your fly line than fishing? If your answer to any of the above questions is yes, you should think about taking a couple minutes before hitting the water to stretch your fly line out.

Read More »

7 Easy Steps To Successful Saltwater Fly-Fishing: Video Round-up

2 comments / Posted on / by

Let’s review some basic skills you need to get started catching fish on the fly in saltwater.

Success in saltwater fly fishing is all about the fundamentals. If you understand and practice the fundamental skills you will catch fish. There is a lifetime of learning but once you have the basic skills it’s a blast learning the rest.

Saltwater fly fishing doesn’t have to be daunting. Any angler can learn and today we’re going to review the skills you need for some great days on the water. Skills simple enough for any angler to understand and put into practice.

7 VIDEOS TO HELP YOU CATCH FISH ON THE FLY IN SALTWATER

Let’s start with the most basic and likely most important aspect of saltwater fly fishing, communicating with your guide. Understanding the

Read More »

Winter Steelhead on the Fly: Video

No comments yet / Posted on / by

Winter is here and, for those willing to brave the elements that means big winter steelhead.

Unfortunately, there will be no steelhead for me this winter. That doesn’t mean they aren’t on my mind and if I can’t get after them myself, I can at least watch my buddies do it. This great video by Todd Moen from 2014 features my buddy Jeff Hickman and is one of my favorites.

ENJOY, “WINTER RUN, PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER STEELHEAD FLY FISHING”

Read More »

Choosing a Fly Rod is Like Choosing a Guitar

30 comments / Posted on / by

“WHO ARE THOSE $850 FLY RODS FOR? IF THE EXPERTS DON’T NEED THEM AND THE BEGINNERS CAN’T APPRECIATE THEM, WHO NEEDS THEM?”

If you follow G&G on Facebook then you probably know about my love of old school blues. If you don’t follow us on Facebook, you should, you’re missing half the fun.

click here to join the G&G FaceBook family

I went out the other night to see my friend Gabriel Szucs, AKA “Little G Weevil,” play some blues at a local bar. G is a singularity. Hungarian born, he moved to the states, to the south specifically, to immerse himself in the roots of the blues. After years on Beale St. in Memphis, he fell in love and married a gal from Atlanta and moved there for her. That’s the only way we would ever have a local blues player of his talent.

I discovered G in a hole in the wall BBQ joint called Hottie Hawgs. It’s a dive but there was briefly an awesome music scene there. Trust me when I tell you that this guy is a world class talent. Unfortunately, no one has told the Hungarians that Americans haven’t given a shit about the blues for forty years so you’ve likely never heard of him.

Honestly, you haven’t heard G until you’ve heard him live. It’s his jaw dropping improvisation and the way he responds to the crowd that blows you away. OK, I’m getting to the fishing. I expected to see G playing his flame top Fibenare or maybe his 1940 Kay, both remarkable guitars, but instead, there he sat with a cheap Epiphone acoustic that he payed $150 for in a Mississippi pawn shop.

He slapped a vintage pickup on it and off he went. It sounded amazing! I could not believe he was playing those licks on an acoustic. Epiphones, Gibson’s budget priced imports, are OK guitars but most good players couldn’t play like that on a Taylor or Martin.

“Yeah, it’s hard to play but I don’t care,” G told me. “I like the way it sounds, it’s different.”

You sure couldn’t tell that it was hard to play and that got me thinking about fly rods. You can spend anywhere from $200 to $5000 on a fly rod. You can pay more if you want a really special collectors item but what do you need?

It’s a complicated question. I have some inexpensive rods that I love. I have some really expensive ones I love too. What’s the difference? Other than

Read More »

Swing For The Fence On Every Cast

5 comments / Posted on / by

By Louis Cahill

After four days swinging flies in dirty water without a pull it’s easy to lose faith.

I faced some pretty tough conditions on a recent trip to the Dean River in British Columbia. Heavy rain turned the river into a raging mess of mud and floating trees. It was not a pretty sight, but I turned it around.

High water tactics can be laborious. Fishing long heavy sink tips and weighted flies makes casting a chore and swinging your fly a downright pain in the ass. You have to put the fly where the fish are and in high water they are hunkered down on structure or hugging the bank. Getting down to submerged structure in fast water means weight and lots of it. That means lots of hanging up on the rocks, especially at the end of your swing.

After four days with no action and hanging your fly up on every cast it’s easy to start avoiding the water that you know is going to give you trouble. Little things like picking up your fly just before it reaches the end of its swing or not giving that sink tip quite as long to sink makes robotic fishing easier on your nerves. The problem is, it doesn’t catch fish.

The worst is when, after days of toil without a fish, you snag that rock and immediately throw your line over it only to see it turn and bolt downstream without your fly in its mouth. We’ve all done it. I learned long ago that big fish often eat like rocks. I always hold pressure on a rock for a few seconds at least. It’s paid off many times and it paid off again in BC.

After four days of fishing and clearing ten thousand snags, when my fly stopped I held on, maybe ten seconds, before a beautiful bright steelhead gave me a sign of life. Ten seconds feels like an eternity at the end of four days but it’s like Lou Reed says, “You need a bus load of faith to get by.”

Kent calls it fishing with confidence. Faith or confidence, either way a good fisherman always believes in his heart that, this is the cast. Eventually he’s right. My numbers were

Read More »

Is Pay-To-Play Fly Fishing Good For Anybody?

2 comments / Posted on / by

By Louis Cahill

If you pay hundreds of dollars for the chance to catch a really big trout on someones private water, are you doing the right thing?

Pay-to-play fishing is a hot button issue. It came up in conversation the other day so I thought I’d put my two cents in. I don’t have any data to back this up, but my guess is that a pretty small percentage of anglers regularly pay to fish private water. I’d guess that a fare number of us do it a time or two and move on and a very small number do little else. On the other hand there are an equally small number who would never consider it.

What you figure out pretty quickly is, whenever pay-to-play comes up, there’s going to be an argument. The fur usually starts to fly when fish size becomes the topic. If you are boasting about catching a trophy size trout on your local pay-to-play water you’re very likely going to hear how, “That fish doesn’t count,” or how, “That’s bullshit.” 

It’s true that there is no comparing a hand fed pet to a wild fish of the same size. Perhaps there is no comparing the effort or skill that went into catching those fish, but there is certainly no comparing how unique, special or important those two fish are. Wild trophy size trout are a treasure and should be treated as such. All of that said, if you are boasting about the size of your fish to establish yourself as a superior angler, you’re probably a douche bag. If you’re trying to spoil someone else’s excitement by calling their fish bullshit, you’re just as bad. That’s my opinion.

Focusing on numbers or size takes the fun out of fishing for me. I don’t count fish and when I do measure a fish it’s about appreciating what a special fish it is and how fortunate I was to catch it. Not for one instant do I hold to the idea that it makes me special as an angler. I’ve been at this long enough to know that humility is waiting in the next run. I like to hear anglers talk about special fish and I like to talk about them too. I think that’s something we all share, I just think it sucks when it ends in an argument.

SO HERE ARE SOME FACTS ABOUT PAY-TO-PLAY FISHING.

Read More »