Saturday Shoutout / Feather Bender

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By Carter Lyles

SIMPLE EASY FLIES FOR TROUT

When I first checked out the blog, The Feather Bender, I noticed that a good portion of Barry Clarke’s posts was tutorials on tying classic, highly productive flies.

This is a great blog site for the beginner fly tier.

The Feather Bender provides viewers with easy to follow steps on tying classic patterns that include descriptions, high-quality pictures, and even videos.

So if you were ever intimidated or even discouraged about tying flies, Barry’s site can make it a very smooth and easy experience for you at zero cost… well except for the materials, a vise, scissors, bobbins, hooks, etc… But honestly what else would you spend your money on? Clothes? Would you spend it on clothes? Pshhh… I wouldn’t. Maybe my own giraffe like in Hangover III, but we all know how that turned out.

http://thefeatherbender.com/

HAIL BREEZY!

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Finn Utility, Authentic American Fly Fishing

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YOU HAVE NEVER SEEN FLY FISHING GEAR LIKE THIS.

Finn Utility is a starkly unique brand. In a gear landscape filled with shiny technical fabrics and high-tech feature laden designs, Finn reminds us why we fell in love with fly fishing. Simplicity, attention to detail, quality and authenticity.

Finn products evoke a feeling of times gone by, but the designs are not outdated. These are today’s products, made like we used to make things, here in America. Owning a piece of Finn gear is like having a vintage pick up, fully restored with a modern engine. It’s hard not to fall in love with that.

Their motto says it all.

Authenticity is the new luxury.

Check out the video to see some of the new Finn products, including the rod roll. I have one and I love it!

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7 Extraordinary Fly Fishing Artists

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See art from 7 amazing artists!

By Carter Lyles

ART AND FLY FISHING SEEM TO BE JOINED AT THE HIP. HERE ARE 7 ARTISTS WE LOVE AND THINK YOU WILL TOO.

PAUL PUCKETT
Honestly I don’t know where you have been if you haven’t yet heard of the work that Paul Puckett puts out. But it’s okay if you haven’t, because I am telling you now. Famous for his renderings of celebrities with fish, Paul, the owner of Flood Tide Co, has been behind the brush longer than he has a fly rod. Just check out what he did for us over here at Gink and Gasoline. I think it speaks for itself. http://paulpuckettart.com/

DEREK DEYOUNG
Derek brings his own unique twist to fly fishing art, which is why he, and his company, has been so successful. Derek is not satisfied with attempting to make fish look realistic as possible, but rather bringing something new to the table captivates him. http://www.derekdeyoung.com/

VAUGHN COCHRAN
This guy is the man. Vaughn, the owner of Black Fly Outfitters, Restaurant, and Lodge was a fly fishing guide in just about every saltwater destination south of Georgia that you can think of. His art is immediately recognizable due to the wide variety of colors used to portray saltwater fish. Another interesting fact about Vaughn is that he was apart of the original Jimmy Buffett Coral Reefers Band. Damn cool guy. http://www.vaughncochranart.com/

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5 Tips For Technical Tailwaters

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By Johnny Spillane

A QUICK RESPONSE TO LOUIS’S ARTICLE “TROUT ARE NOT SMARTER THAN PEOPLE, BUT THEY MAY BE SMARTER THAN ME.”
Trout have a brain that is smaller then a pea. No offense to Louis, but I’m positive that you can out-think a trout in a technical tailwater situation.

HERE ARE FIVE TIPS TO HELP YOU CATCH INCREDIBLY “SMART” FISH.

1. Go light and go small.
Fish are creatures of their environment. If they see small bugs all the time then you have to fish accordingly. 7X tippet and size 24 or 26 bugs are what the fish are looking for. Go down in tippet size before you switch fly patterns.

2. Match the sky
If you are fishing with an indictor, go with something that matches the color of the sky. If it’s overcast, use gray yarn, if it’s clear use a small clear or white Thingamabobber or yarn. You can also use a Slinky indicator. They are deadly with picky fish.

3. Use stealthy weight
If you are using split shot, make sure they are not flashy at all. Anything painted in a moss green is better then silver lead.

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Rising Tools, Innovation and Quality at a Remarkable Price

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By Louis Cahill

THERE’S GOOD STUFF COMING OUT OF SALT LAKE CITY.

Every now and then I run across an innovative piece of equipment that changes the way I do things. To find a single product like that from any company is a home run but I found three amazing tools from Rising, that have not only changed my habits but done it at a price that’s hard to believe.

The first thing you notice about Rising tools is their innovative design. They don’t look like fishing tools, certainly not the old school tools I grew up with. These things look like some kind of surgical implements. And I’m not talking about hemostats. These tools are heavy duty, precise and beautifully finished. Absolutely the nicest fishing tools I’ve ever used.

You’d expect that kind of quality in a pair of saltwater pliers that you dropped a couple of hundred bucks on but not when you spent twenty. That’s right, $20 for the Rising Rancher, which has quickly become my favorite fly fishing accessory ever. I honestly don’t know how they make a dime at that price. So I called them up and asked.

I spoke to Dylan Rothwell, the man behind Rising Tools. It was an interesting conversation. Dylan is clearly a super smart guy with a lot of fishing days under his belt who isn’t afraid to make a living using his hands. He told me his original vision was to make all of the products there in Salt Lake but he was quickly priced out of the market. So he came up with a solution that’s pretty clever and is working very well.

Some of Risings products are made in America. Others are made in Asia and finished in the shop in Salt Lake. That means that they are fitted, polished and sharpened by the man who put his name on them. What you get is a remarkable product at an amazing price. So you can buy another company’s made-in-America nippers for $50-$100 and they’ll be pretty good, or you can buy another company’s Asian knock-off of those nippers for $30 and they’ll be so-so, or you can buy Rising’s Big Nippa for $12 and they’ll out-perform the $100 pair. I’m not kidding.

SO HERE ARE THE THREE RISING FISHING TOOLS THAT I USE AND LOVE EVERY DAY ON THE WATER.

THE BIG NIPPA $12

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A G&G Exclusive Interview With Hank Patterson

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Watch this hysterical video!

By Carter Lyles

This is an exclusive interview with the top fly fishing guide in all of the land, Patterson. Hank Patterson. Hank’s legendary status is unmatched, and he has often been referred to as the “Tim Tebow” and the “Chuck Norris” of fly-fishing. Known for dropping a 700lb grizzly bear with his signature move, “The Chode Paralyzer,” as well as having consistent multi-hookups on his famous hopper hopper dropper hopper dropper dropper hopper dropper rig, native cutty rainbrowns have come to fear his presence. Oh, by the way, he is also the rightful owner to “A River Runs Through It” on Blu-ray, so you could say he knows a thing or two about fly-fishing!

Carter: Hank, if you could sing one song on American Idol, what would it be and why?




Hank: I have absolutely no idea what American Idol is. That said, on a
 recent road trip to Picabo, Idaho, I found myself humming Elton John’s
 “Daniel.” Having no idea what the actual words are, I made up my
 own… If you know the tune, feel free to sing along…


 Hank Patterson’s traveling tonight on a boat,

 He just tied a caddis on and he’s watching it flo-o-o-oat…

 Oh and… I can see Hank, he casts like a God…

 Looks like he hooked a RainBrown!

 A fifteen-pound hog on a five-weight rod….




Carter: What would you do during a Zombie Apocalypse? Grab a cub?

Hank: First thing I’d do is get a good, tight fitting helmet with a chin
 strap that locks. Zombie’s love brains. Second thing I’d do is start
 hanging around with people who are a lot clumsier and slower than I
 am. If a pack of Zombies comes around, you don’t have to be the
 fastest guy in the group, you just can’t be the slowest. Third thing
 I’d do is go pillage a few fly shops, grab some sweet gear, a lifetime
 of flies and head for the mountains.




Carter: If G & G were a high school kid, what kind of person would they be?




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Sunday Classic / Anchor Placement When Space Is Tight

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Watch the Video!

You could write a book about anchor placement in Spey casting.

In fact, I feel sure several have been written. Rightfully so, since anchor placement is the foundation on which a good Spey cast is built. For those who are not aware, the anchor is where the fly is placed in the water as the Spey cast begins. The rule of thumb is this. Your anchor should be placed a rod length away and forty-five degrees to one side or the other of the direction you intend to cast.

Simple enough but that’s a little like the ten and two rule. It’s not quite the whole story. First off, the forty-five degree mark is where your anchor should be when you hit your forward stroke. This means that you have to take current speed and direction into account when you place the fly. There are other real world factors that come into play as well. One of them is frequently brush or rocks that interfere with your D-loop.

There are some simple ways around this but rather than try to explain it in text, I’m going to let my buddy Jeff Hickman show you how to get the cast off when space is tight, in this video.

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