8 of the Spookiest Waters to Fish

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WARNING!

Your home water could be on this list and you may not even know that it is haunted. This is a fly fisher’s Halloween brought to you by Gink and Gasoline! Enjoy reading about the top 13 spookiest places to fish … Look out behind you!

#1) The Red River, TN
You can fish for striped bass, largemouth, catfish, and more all throughout the year on Tennessee’s Red River. Not only is it a great warmwater river to fish, but it also comes with a dark past. The story of the Bell Witch is one of the most well known supernatural stories in American history. President Andrew Jackson even acknowledged the tales of the witch spirit who terrorized Betsy Bell while he was in office! You can reach the famous Bell Witch Cave by the Red River, which runs by the Bell family property. A witch has terrorized this cave for centuries, and there have been a few eerie sightings of the Bell Witch on the Red River as well.

#2) The Potomac River, MD
The Potomac River is home to largemouth bass, striped bass, witches, and smallmouth bass. In Mallow’s Bay, which is apart of the Potomac River, you will find the biggest ship graveyard in the entire western hemisphere. Mallow’s Bay contains over 230 ships that were sunk in its waters. Not only does the Potomac River hold ghostly ship graveyard, but it also runs through the Black Hills – the famous location of the Blair Witch Project!

#3) Rock Creek, PA
Rock Creek, also known as the Monocacy River, is a well-known trout fishing destination on the East coast. Rock Creek is in south-central Pennsylvania and runs across the state borer into Maryland. You know what it also runs through? Rock Creek runs through Gettysburg, the site of the bloodiest battle in the history of the United States. Over 45,000 soldiers lost their lives by Rock Creek, and locals still report sightings of Confederate soldiers firing muskets across the once bloody waters.

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Each One, Teach One

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By Louis Cahill

I’VE GOT SOME HOMEWORK FOR YOU.

Last weekend Kent and I floated a local tailwater. I’ve been traveling like a demon all summer and it was a great chance to hang out, catch up, empty some beer cans and fish some local water. Days like that are chicken soup for my soul. Spending so much time on the road, I miss my friends and family. As you can imagine, there is a long list of folks looking to be in the third seat on that boat. Good friends who I don’t see enough of, hardcore anglers I always learn a trick or two from, guys who consistently put nice fish in front of my lens. It’s tough to make a choice.

This time out we made a great choice. Rather than rowing an old friend or badass angler down the river, we took Kent’s new neighbor. A great guy with very little fly fishing experience. I’m not sure if Heath knew what he was getting into when he stepped into that boat. Kent immediately slipped into guide mode. He told Heath to leave his rod in the truck and put his setup in his hands. Walked him through the fly selection and how to fish the team effectively. Taught him how to read the water and where to place the fly. Coached him on how to play fish and encouraged Heath at every step, praising every good cast. Before we had floated a mile, Heath had caught his biggest trout ever.

It was an awesome thing to watch. There’s nothing like seeing the lights come on for a new angler. Neither Kent or I spent as much time fishing as we might have but it was well worth it. We boated a real trophy. A new avid fly angler. And Heath’s appreciation was abundant and all the reward we needed.

I remember when I started fly fishing. I sucked for years, trying to figure it out on my own until

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Baby Tarpon Slam Fest

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By Bruce Chard

IT’S FALL IN THE FLORIDA KEYS AND THE EXCITEMENT BUILDS EARLY IN THE MORNING ON THE WAY TO THE BOAT RAMP.

Its 83 degrees and still pitch dark outside. The AC in the truck is trying to cut through the high humidity. You can see limp flags, but doubt lingers that the water is actually glass calm until you reach that first bridge where you can inspect the true water conditions. AHHHH YES! Glass.

This not only confirms the guarantee of at least an enjoyable morning on the water, but also creates an instant increase in moisture build up on the outside of your lips, as you nervously lick them over and over. With every lick the RPMs on the truck engine increase as we envision how good the baby tarpon fishing should be.

These calm, hot and humid weather conditions combined with an increase in floating sea grass build up are common in the fall and play an important role in reducing oxygen content in the shallow water by early in the morning. This forces shrimp to leave the protection of the sea grass below and drives them up to the surface in search of more oxygen. As the shrimp try to reach the surface and break through the sea grass the baby tarpon and snappers are there to greet them.

Any shrimp that make it to the surface then get plucked up by any number of different sea birds hovering above. This creates an incredible feeding frenzy that can all be seen on the surface of the water from a long way away. Baby tarpon rely on these shrimp hatches as a main food source. Staging up in these areas during the fall months allows them to take advantage of shrimp hatches whenever the conditions are right.

I hear many of my anglers commen

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The Gink and Gasoline Fly Shop 500

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WHICH SHOP WILL BE THE 2014 FLY SHOP OF THE YEAR

2014 is winding down. It’s been a great year of fly fishing for us and we hope it has been for you! Now it’s time to show our support for the guys who have been behind us on every cast, every drift and every fish in the net. The good folks at our local fly shop! This year Gink and Gasoline is putting our money where our mouth is. We are giving some serious love to the best fly shop in the country, in the form of a year’s free advertising!

But who will decide which shop is best?

The 2014 Fly Shop of the Year will be decided by the most knowledgeable, most dedicated, most engaged anglers on the planet. You! Our readers.

FlyShop500headerTHE FLY SHOP 500 – TAKE YOUR SHOP ACROSS THE FINISH LINE.

This competition is comprised of twenty-seven of the most elite fly shops in the nation, all fighting for The Fly Shop 500 competition crown January 1st.

How to Play:
Click here to vote for your hometown or home-state fly shop
Share our content on our social media pages so your friends can vote too!
Spread the word!

The Winner will Receive:
An entire year of free advertising on Gink and Gasoline
Fly Shop 500 gear
Bragging rights for an entire year

DON’T WAIT! GIVE BACK TO YOUR FLY SHOP! THEY ARE COUNTING ON THEIR PIT CREW…

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Sunday Classic / Carp on the Fly – 12 Q&A’s to Get You Ready

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GOOD FRIEND AND FLY FISHING GUIDE, RYAN DUNNE HAS BEEN CAPITALIZING ON THE GROWING CARP BUZZ BY FLY ANGLERS LATELY.
Ryan commented, “I’ve seen a significant increase in carp fishing inquiries the last two years, and when the dog days of summer arrive and the trout fishing bite goes south, I now opt for poling my skiff and guiding my clients to carp on my local rivers and lakes”. Thank you Ryan for taking the time to sit down with Gink & Gasoline to answer twelve frequently asked questions about fly fishing for carp.

Have you found certain colors of fly patterns to be more effective than others?
I find that the water conditions and ambient light conditions dictate which color is more effective. I typically stick to four different colors when tying carp flies. They are black, brown, olive, and orange. Although the majority of my flies are tied in the aforementioned colors, I do tie with other colors as well.

Have you found certain fly tying materials (synthetics or natural) that carp seem to dislike?
I haven’t noticed a difference in carp behavior towards either type of material. However, most of my fly patterns contain a combination of both synthetic and natural fly tying materials.

What are a couple of your favorite go-to carp flies?
My two favorite patterns are the Carp Carrot and Carp Dragon.

Is the weight of your fly patterns critical and if yes, when do you prefer heavier flies?

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Saturday Shoutout / Feather Bender

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By Carter Lyles

SIMPLE EASY FLIES FOR TROUT

When I first checked out the blog, The Feather Bender, I noticed that a good portion of Barry Clarke’s posts was tutorials on tying classic, highly productive flies.

This is a great blog site for the beginner fly tier.

The Feather Bender provides viewers with easy to follow steps on tying classic patterns that include descriptions, high-quality pictures, and even videos.

So if you were ever intimidated or even discouraged about tying flies, Barry’s site can make it a very smooth and easy experience for you at zero cost… well except for the materials, a vise, scissors, bobbins, hooks, etc… But honestly what else would you spend your money on? Clothes? Would you spend it on clothes? Pshhh… I wouldn’t. Maybe my own giraffe like in Hangover III, but we all know how that turned out.

http://thefeatherbender.com/

HAIL BREEZY!

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Finn Utility, Authentic American Fly Fishing

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YOU HAVE NEVER SEEN FLY FISHING GEAR LIKE THIS.

Finn Utility is a starkly unique brand. In a gear landscape filled with shiny technical fabrics and high-tech feature laden designs, Finn reminds us why we fell in love with fly fishing. Simplicity, attention to detail, quality and authenticity.

Finn products evoke a feeling of times gone by, but the designs are not outdated. These are today’s products, made like we used to make things, here in America. Owning a piece of Finn gear is like having a vintage pick up, fully restored with a modern engine. It’s hard not to fall in love with that.

Their motto says it all.

Authenticity is the new luxury.

Check out the video to see some of the new Finn products, including the rod roll. I have one and I love it!

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