Fighting Big Bonefish

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We’ve talked about casting to bonefish in a variety of conditions. We’ve talked about the propped retrieve to get the fish to eat. Now that your hooking up with all of these big bones owe buddy Bruce Chard is back with some advice on fighting bonefish. Check out the video and Bruce will show you how to get that fish to the boat as efficiently as possible. If you missed Bruce’s earlier bone fishing posts, check them out now. Better Posture For Line Speed Snap Your Wrist For Line Speed The V-Grip The Belgian Cast Better Bonefish Retrieve Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Carp on the Fly – 12 Q&A’s to Get You Ready

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Good friend and fly fishing guide, Ryan Dunne has been capitalizing on the growing carp buzz by fly anglers lately. Ryan commented, “I’ve seen a significant increase in carp fishing inquiries the last two years, and when the dog days of summer arrive and the trout fishing bite goes south, I now opt for poling my skiff and guiding my clients to carp on my local rivers and lakes”. Thank you Ryan for taking the time to sit down with Gink & Gasoline to answer twelve frequently asked questions about fly fishing for carp. Have you found certain colors of fly patterns to be more effective than others? I find that the water conditions and ambient light conditions dictate which color is more effective. I typically stick to four different colors when tying carp flies. They are black, brown, olive, and orange. Although the majority of my flies are tied in the aforementioned colors, I do tie with other colors as well. Have you found certain fly tying materials (synthetics or natural) that carp seem to dislike? I haven’t noticed a difference in carp behavior towards either type of material. However, most of my fly patterns contain a combination of both synthetic and natural fly tying materials. What are a couple of your favorite go-to carp flies? My two favorite patterns are the Carp Carrot and Carp Dragon. Is the weight of your fly patterns critical and if yes, when do you prefer heavier flies? Weight is definitely a key part to my subsurface carp patterns. Feeding carp rarely stay in one place, so you want to get your fly in the feeding zone as quick as possible. Water depth will dictate the weight of my patterns. I find that bead-chain and dumbbell eyes in various sizes are ideal for … Continue reading

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Guide Dos And Don’ts

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I fully expect to catch some heat for this. When I wrote the list of client dos and don’ts I quoted my friend Kirk and agreed whole heartedly with the glowing things he had to say about fishing guides. I took that one step farther by emailing a bunch of my friends who guide and putting together a list of the stuff they would like to tell their clients but don’t feel like they can. I’m sure there were some things on that list a lot of guys didn’t want to hear so, in the interest of fair play, today the guides get their list of dos and don’ts. I fully expect to catch some heat for this, so please try to understand where it’s coming from. I’m a big fan of fishing guides. As I’ve said most of my friends are fishing guides and I have a great deal of respect for the men and women who do that job. I will quote Kirk Deeter again, “I think the sun rises and sets on the fly fishing world where guides collectively say it does. They are stewards of their rivers. They are the innovators, and the teachers. And a good guide is, for fly fishing and trout conservation, worth his or her weight in gold.” I have however fished with guides who were less than stellar, for one reason or another. Since I did a list of dos and don’ts for clients, it seems only fair to do the same for guides. I expect most of the guides who read this will agree with what I have to say. Most of it is very obvious and simple. If you do not, I encourage you to look at it from the other side of the boat. I’ve seen everything on … Continue reading

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Sunday Classic / Shoot Raw Files

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Here’s another tip for the shutter bugs. Most cameras default to shooting a jpeg file. Jpeg files are great for looking at on your computer, sending in email, posting on the web and even for casual prints. But if your camera has a raw file setting, there is a whole world of rich color and contrast control at your fingertips. Raw files are intimidating for most people and with good reason. You will need special software to process these files before you can really do anything with them and this will require an investment of money and time. But if you really want to take your photography to the next level, raw files are a valuable tool. I don’t usually recommend specific products or brands but I feel so strongly about Adobe’s Lightroom application that, in this case, I am going to say you should seriously consider it. I know of nothing on the market that comes close for processing raw files. I’ll take a break on photo tips now. If you want more, let me know. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Saturday Shoutout / 3 Worth a Read

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Here’s your spring reading list for 2012. Three great pieces from three great writers.   Bonefish on the Brain Know Thyself Bjorn Stromsness writes about his doubts as an angler in this wonderfully honest piece. This is an exercise we should all undertake. Thanks Bjorn! Nicely done.   The Fishing Poet The Gift of Memory Matt Smythe receives a posthumous gift of a fly rod from his Grandmother. A touching reminder of those loved and lost. Mysteries Internal Songs in the Dark and a Stonefly The final chapter in Erin Block’s bamboo rod saga…or is it? I have really enjoyed reliving the thrill of the first bamboo rod through Erin’s writing. Thanks Girl!   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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RS2 – One of My Favorite Picky Trout Fly Patterns

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There’s days when trout fishing is so slow, it seems like conditions couldn’t possibly get any worse. You may find yourself questioning if any trout in the stream are willing to feed at all. At other times, you’ll have no problem locating pods of steady risers, but everything you throw at them is rejected. My buddy Brad in this situation usually volunteers to row the boat, opting for cold beer within arms distance and gazing at picturesque landscapes. The dude always has a Plan B ready to be put into action, ensuring he always has a good time on the water whether he catches fish or just a buzz, and I respect that. The RS2 fly pattern time and time again never fails to produce for me during tough fishing situations. And it really has the ability to catch fish just about any way you fish it. Fish it solo on fine tippet to wary sippers and you’ll fool a couple guaranteed. Drop it off the back of a larger and more visible dry fly if you’re having problems seeing it, and it will ride in the film, usually fooling fish on even the most technical trout water. I even have great luck fishing an RS2 as my dropper fly in a tandem nymph rig dredging along the bottom of the stream. Thank you Rim Chung for inventing this dynamite fly pattern. Primarily, the RS2 was created as a baetis emerger imitation that would ride in the surface film, but tie it small enough, and it can also work very well imitating midges. Do me a favor and next time you’re getting your butt handed to you on the water, tie on an RS2 and see if you can’t turn your luck around. Rim Chung’s website and RS2 Tying Instructions Keep … Continue reading

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Fight Big Fish with the Butt Section of the Fly Rod Not the Tip

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If you fly fish long enough and pay your dues, it’s just a matter of time until you hook into a giant fish and experience defeat. I’ve always loved the saying, “It’s always the big ones that get away”, like it provides anglers a viable excuse for losing battles with big fish. I’ll admit there are times when we’re at complete mercy of big fish, and defeat is 99% inevitable, but most battles are lost due to angler error, specifically by fighting big fish incorrectly with the fly rod. For many anglers, every time they lose a big fish, a portion of their fish-fighting confidence disappears with it, and they become more paranoid with each unsuccessful encounter. Overtime, this paranoia and lack of confidence distorts their fish fighting instincts, and they begin to play big fish too conservatively, thinking if they put more pressure on the fish, the tippet will break or the hook will pull free. What they end up doing most of the time is fighting the fish with their rod tip instead of fighting the fish with the mid-section and butt section of the rod. This seriously limits an anglers ability to apply power and steer the fish during a fight, because all the power comes from the butt and mid-section of the rod, not the tip. It also will keep the leverage in the fish’s court, which will take it far longer for you to tire out a big fish. Fight times can be doubled, sometimes even tripled, and that’s bad news for a trophy specimen if the battle is taking place during the year when oxygen levels are low (you can play a fish to death). Furthermore, the longer the fight is prolonged, the better the chance something could go wrong, resulting in a fish … Continue reading

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Caption Contest Winner

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 Thanks to everyone who participated! I guess we never get tired of fart jokes.We had some great entries for the caption contest. A few of my favorites were: “He puts the gas in Gink and Gasoline.”  By Jake “If you are not going to spin me I’ll do it myself….activate bow thruster now!”  By Chris Lewis “Business in the front, party in the back. ” By Patrick   After careful consideration, the winner is Russ with: “I knew the guide was blowing smoke up my ass.” Congratulations Russ!  Send me your address and I’ll get your print in the mail.     Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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How to Stop the Dreaded Fly Fishing Birds Nest

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Does this look familiar? Just about every angler has created this tangled artwork at some point, some more than others. I’m pretty good at untangling knots because I get more practice than the average angler from my guiding, but even this one required me to break out a fresh leader and completely re-rig. If you find yourself untangling knots more than you’re fishing, try fixing the problem by following these five helpful tips. 1. Watch your forward cast and backcast when false casting. “In the film A River Runs Through It”, Jerry Siem (one of the casting stuntmen) never watched his backcast. It’s important to note that his fly casting skill level ranks among the best in the world, which allowed him to get away without doing this. It’s also pertinent to point out he was casting a single dry fly in the movie scene, not a tandem nymph rig with split-shot and a strike indicator. Could he have made the same casts in the movie with a tandem nymph rig without tangles, of course he could, but that doesn’t mean every other angler out there should try to mimic him. The majority of the best casters in the world watch their backcast, especially when they’re fly fishing in areas where casting room is limited. Your first step to limiting the number of tangles you create on the river is to watch your forward and backcast diligently. Your timing will be better, you’ll find you won’t need to make as many false casts, and you’ll keep your flies out of the trees and bushes. 2. Cast with grace, not with power and muscle. Many fly anglers out there cast their fly rod much harder than they need to. So hard in many cases, that they end up overloading the rod and … Continue reading

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Dos and Don’ts For Guided Fishing

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“I have done enough guiding with enough people of all types that I sometimes cheer for the fish.” My friend Kirk Deeter, writing on the Trout Unlimited blog April 25th, threw out the bold headline: “Guides: Gatekeepers or Profiteers”. There’s no mystery where Kirk stands on the subject. He goes on to write, “I think the sun rises and sets on the fly fishing world where guides collectively say it does. They are stewards of their rivers. They are the innovators, and the teachers. And a good guide is, for fly fishing and trout conservation, worth his or her weight in gold.” I agree with Kirk completely but it’s apparently a controversial topic. Not everyone loves fishing guides and it got me wondering why. Most of my friends are, or have been, fishing guides. I am not, but I hear the stories and I remember having a few rough days with guides back in the day. I mentioned it to Kirk and this was his response. “You ask a great question here. Let me put it to you this way. I have done enough guiding with enough people of all types that I sometimes cheer for the fish. Seriously. You can say I said that. On the other hand, nothing lights me up more than sharing a passion with someone who gets it, appreciates it, and really shows some genuine class and enthusiasm. A great guide and client team should be like a Bwana and his tracker… two people on one mission… bound by respect.” I reached out to a few more friends in the guiding business and asked them, from their perspective, where things go wrong. I decided to make a list. I figured, like Rodney King said, “why can’t we all just get along?” People hire guides for … Continue reading

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