Tell a Story

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Here’s another tip on taking better photos on you next fishing trip. Everyone wants a hero shot with that monster fish but lots of people don’t think about all the details that go into a fishing trip when they are shooting pictures. These kind of detail shots tell the story of how you got to that fish. That’s what will really make your buddies who didn’t make the trip jealous. Take the time to get shots of the flies, the gear in the back of the truck, your buddies getting off the plane. When you get home, make a slide show and show it off. You will be surprised how many more invitations you will get for fishing trips. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

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Georgia Man Catches Trout On Car Key, But Why?

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Why in the hell would you fish that? I’m glad you asked. To prove a point. For some reason this year I have run into more anglers with attitude than usual. Ranging from the dry fly purest who think they walk on the water rather than fish it, to the Bonos of fly fishing who keep a sharpie handy for a quick autograph. Here’s an example. I was on a photo shoot a while back on the Henry’s Fork. I had a few minutes to fish and frankly, I needed a fish to photograph, so I asked the guide for a rod. He gave me a set up with a Chernobyl Ant, the fly everyone else was using to NOT catch fish. I didn’t have my gear so I ask if he had any streamers. The reply I got brought steam out of my ears. “This is the Henry’s Fork and we don’t do that here”. Rather than launch into a diatribe on what horse shit that is, I explained that this was my job and I needed a fish and may I please have a streamer. Within a few casts I had my fish. The guide was clearly irritated and insisted that it meant nothing. I was talking, ok bitching, about this narrow view of fishing to Kent, over a few beers, when he challenged me to come up with the most f¥€ked up thing I could catch a fish on. After a few ideas we decided on a car key. I liked this because I cary a key chain with way too many keys. So I picked out a key and tied on a hook with a marabou tail. To further infuriate the purest I chose to fish it on 30 lb cuda wire. We were floating the … Continue reading

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Hold That Fish

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I’ll be doing a few tips on how to take better fishing photos. Here are a few tips on holding a fish for a photo. First and most important, always respect the fish. They are a precious resource and we want to release them in good condition. Hold the fish gently under the peck fins and by the tail. If you squeeze him he will panic and struggle. A gentle grip will make your fish and angler more relaxed for the photo. Keep him close to the water and drop his head under for a few breathes every 10 seconds or so. Fish start to fade when they are out of the water and this will keep his colors bright. Be sure all of his fins are nicely displayed and not held back against his body or under a hand. Lastly, most anglers will instinctively tail a fish with an overhand grip but an underhand grip covers less of the fish and looks better in a photo. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com  

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Look At The Body On That Thingamabobber

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I use Thingamabobber’s almost exclusively these days for my nymph fishing. They seem to cast easier for my novice anglers than traditional synthetic fiber strike indicators, and I don’t have to load them down with fly floatant. Westwater Products caught my attention this year at the ITFD show, introducing their Thingamabody product line with 61 different colors.  That’s right, now you can tie some killer fly patterns with the super buoyant and waterproof Thingamabody. I really think this is a great idea, and it proves that Westwater Products continues to think outside the box, catering to fly fisherman with their innovative product development team approach. We’ll be trying these guys out the first week in September in Wyoming and we’ll follow up with you on how they work. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com  

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Look Up Once In A While

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I’m driving from Colorado to Wyoming to fish the upper Green River. The sun is going down and I’ve just passed over Flaming Gorge when I come upon this view. I stop the car and walk out to the edge. The car door is open and Fleetwood Mac’s “The Chain” is blaring. The wind is cold at my back and strong enough that I have to lean into it, like it’s saying, go on, do it. I have goose bumps. It feels like a perfect moment. It makes me think of Spalding Gray. Sad, I feel sure he had one more perfect moment left in him. Maybe this all sounds pretty fruity if you weren’t there but it reminds me that it’s easy to get so focused on the fishing and the shooting photos that I miss the perfect moments. Look up from the water once in a while.   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com  

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You Got to Know When to Fold Um

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Thumbing through the latest Fly Fisherman Magazine recently, I read an article about lightning safety while fly fishing. It was packed full of good safety advice, and I recognized the familiar photo of Louis’s, with our friend Brad on the Gros Ventre River with a lightning strike in the background. I tagged along with the two of them that day, and I’ll never forget how close we all came to being struck by lighting. My finger tips were literally tingling with electricity, which brings me to the purpose of this post. You got to know when to fold um when your out fishing. When weather gets nasty and life threatening, don’t be a hardcore idiot. End the day short to ensure you have the opportunity to come back and fish another day. When you get back to the truck and open that cold beer, you’ll know you made the right decision. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

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Keep It Clean, With A Clearing Cast

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I’ve heard salt water fly fishing described as long periods of boredom punctuated by brief periods of panic. I don’t know that I find staring at miles of gorgeous flats boring but I’ve felt that panic a time or two. It’s a stalking game and when the fish show up, shit happens fast. You often only get one shot and the last thing you need is a line maintenance issue. That’s why you need to make a clearing cast. Start by striping as much line as you can cast off of your reel on to the deck. Because the line you are pulling off of the reel stacks on top of the line coming form the guides, when you try to cast you will be shooting line from the bottom of the pile and it will tangle every time. Like in the photo above. Not what you want when your casting to a fish and certainly not once you’ve fed one. So before you start hunting fish, cast all of that line and strip it back in. Now your stalking your line back to front. Lay it out in nice loose loops, neatly across the deck and into the cockpit, like the photo below. When you get your shot your line will shoot clean and smooth.       Check out Bruce’s site.   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com  

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Soft-Hackle Hares Ear

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Guiding has allowed me the opportunity to examine lots of my clients fly boxes over the years. Quite often I open a fly box and just find a bunch of bream poppers and traditional old school attractor wet flies. I know it sounds crazy but it’s the reality in my region of work. I pause for a few seconds scanning their box intently, and try to give the impression they didn’t waist their money trying to stock their fly box at the local Walmart. I then quickly reply, “No worries, I’ve got plenty of flies that will work today for you”. Seriously though, even when I actually get an angler with a decent selection of usable fly patterns in his/her fly box, I consistently notice one fly pattern that’s absent time and time again. The soft-hackle hares ear is the missing fly I’m referring to here, and although it’s just as deadly at catching fish as its cousin the soft-hackle pheasant-tail, for some reason rookie and intermediate level fly fishermen aren’t being told to stock them. Try fishing a tandem nymph rig with a soft-hackle pheasant-tail trailed behind by a soft-hackle hares ear next time you’re on the water. Day in and day out one of these patterns will be on the trout menu because of their impressionistic buggy features. Once you find out which pattern the fish prefer you can then fine tune your nymph rig further. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@kent-klewein.com  

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Slamtastic!

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Here are three reports from last weekends Denver Carp Slam. Ummmmm, tasty! The Denver Carp Slam, This Is Not Your Father’s TU When was the last time you attended a Trout Unlimited event where a bottle rocket fight broke out? That was the scene last weekend when I attended the Denver Carp Slam, as an observer, not to fish. The Carp Slam is a carp tournament started five years ago by the Denver chapter of Trout Unlimited. It takes place on the South Platte in downtown Denver and the proceeds pay for stream improvements on the river. The Platte, at least the stretch that runs through Denver, is truly a challenged river. OK, that’s too polite. It’s severally F’ed up. Full of trash, dead animals, murder weapons, and amazingly, fish. Carp of coarse but also walleye, smallmouth bass, catfish, and to my surprise, trout. Not in big numbers but pretty good size. That’s where TU comes in. They’re using the carp, to save the trout. It’s a great cause and a great time but most of all, a great bunch of guys. The group is young, energetic and energized about their mission but not taking life too seriously. The experience renewed my faith in TU. I am particularly interested in a group who call them selves The Greenbacks. A group of young TU members on a mission to preserve Colorado’s native fish, and have a good time doing it. Their enthusiasm is contagious. It’s awesome to see a great old institution alive with wish youthful vigor. Hats off to the Denver chapter of TU. Natural Born Carper While photographing the Denver Carp Slam I witnessed something strange and wonderful. The slam is a “pro am” event. Sixteen teams consisting of one pro and one amateur compete to put the most … Continue reading

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Forget About Competition And Focus on Teamwork

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Like many anglers, I enjoy a friendly competition on the water with my buddies. However, if you get too wrapped up in the competition aspect, often it can get out of hand and ruin your day of fishing.  These days I try to forget about competition and who’s catching what. It’s just not important to me anymore, and I instead prefer to focus on teamwork. Teamwork usually yields better fishing results anyway, and it also seems to build camaraderie much better than competition. Below are three reasons I choose teamwork over competition in my fishing. 1. Working as team on the water allows you to dial into the current fishing conditions much quicker. 2. Using a one spotter and one caster team approach caters to more effective spot and stalk fishing. 3. A spotter can provide valuable feedback to the caster on how fish are relating to fly pattern choice and presentation. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

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