Fly Rod Selection For Bonefishing: Video

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By Louis Cahill

You’ve booked that bid bonefish trip, what fly rods should you take?

Saltwater fly fishing requires he angler to respond quickly to changing conditions. Having the right gear makes a huge difference. The problem is, if you don’t have a lot of experience, you may not know what is going to work when the fishing gets tough. In this video, I’ll try to help you sort through it.

The big factor in saltwater fly fishing is wind. Either too much or too little of it. A lot of beginning saltwater anglers want to fish on dead calm days. Believe it or not, it’s just as tough to have too little wind as too much. Bonefish can get really spooky when the water is flat calm and the setup you love in the wind may not produce.

“Which rods should I take,” is the question I get all the time. 

In my opinion, the fly line is an even more important choice. How the rod and line work together to present the fly is what’s really important. I start by choosing the line I want to fish, then I choose the rod I like to cast it. I find I can carry fewer fly rods and catch more fish.

Watch the video and learn about fly rod selection for bonefishing.

Louis Cahill
Gink & Gasoline
www.ginkandgasoline.com
hookups@ginkandgasoline.com
 
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7 thoughts on “Fly Rod Selection For Bonefishing: Video

  1. Have you tried the Cortland Crystal Flats Taper line? It’s a clear floating line. I’m thinking of picking some up for an upcoming trip to Cherokee Sound in Abaco, where I’ve found the fish to be very spooky.

    • I have not, but in general I do not like full clear lines. I think it’s very important to be able to see the attitude of the line when you’re fishing. It’s the only way to know how you fly is moving. Water on the flats is more like a river than a lake. Add to that the effects of the wind and it becomes very complicated. Without a line you can see, your fly often ends up sitting dead, or swimming 100MPH.

    • Also, if you are fishing with a guide- you’ll want a line that the guide can see to help you quickly adjust your cast and follow your fly.

  2. Why not but an Airflo Tropical Line on a 9wt to truly give you punching ability in heavy wind? Curious why tw o8 was other than the feel is slightly similar.

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