Fishsicles

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Kent’s eight weight is bent double, the big steelhead finally within range of the net. We’re in a tough spot. This fish has taken us downstream as far as we can go. We’re backed up against a bridge with a deep hole on one side and a concrete wall on the other. Kent has managed to bring this big fish back upstream and whatever happens is going to happen here and now. The temperature is about zero and the wind is howling. My numb fingers grip the net and I lean forward, waiting for my shot. The fish’s head comes up and I scoop. Holy crap it’s a big fish! Less than half the fish is in the net and I’m losing him. Only one thing to do, I plunge my right hand into the water and tail the fish. He’s landed but my fleece glove is soaked. We manage the fish and I get a few photos but my right hand, now out of the glove, feels like it’s on fire. By the time I get my glove out of my pocket it’s a block of ice. If I hadn’t brought a second pair my day would be over. I’d have frostbite in minutes without a glove on that wet hand. OK, that’s a happy ending. We landed the fish and I had spare gloves, but let’s look at it from the fishes perspective. The fish is like that bare hand. He’s wet and exposed, out in that cold wind. What’s worse is that a fish is cold blooded. He doesn’t have an internal source of heat like I do. The only thing keeping him warm is that water. Have you ever noticed how fast your guides freeze over on a day like that? That fish has little more … Continue reading

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Tying the Chronic Egg Pattern

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Sometimes in fly tying it’s the little things that really make a difference in the quality of your finished fly patterns. When I first started fly tying I always hated the look of my egg patterns because I could always see my thread down the center of my finished eggs or they wouldn’t end up symetrical. They caught fish but they weren’t as pretty as the egg patterns in the fly shops and it used to drive me crazy. Since then I’ve adopted using a really cool fly tying tool called an Egg Yarn Dispenser . It allows me to tie my egg patterns super quick and I get true consistency from one fly to the next. Watch this quick fly tying video of me tying my chronic egg pattern. Hopefully you’ll pick up a couple tips to improve your own egg patterns. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Rudolph The Red Nosed Key Deer

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This photo was captured early this morning after a flying Key Deer made an unscheduled landing in Big Spanish Channel. It has been widely rumored that the little buck was aiming for Big Pine Key but missed due to too many holiday eggnogs. The deer was last seen swimming across the channel to Big Pine. We have no further information as the Big Pine Police Department will not return our calls.   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Sunday Classic / At What Point Does a Fly Become A Lure

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Here’s our Sunday Classic for the week in case you missed it a couple months ago. This fly/lure is a complete joke. Seriously though, at what point does a fly become a lure? Are you carrying a streamer box full of lures? Every year new fly patterns burst onto the scene far from the norm, pushing the boundaries and raising the question, are these true fly patterns or just camouflaged lures? First off, let me get something straight right out of the gates, I”m not one of those traditionalist haters, trying to point the finger. As Rodney Dangerfield quoted in the comedy classic movie, Back to School, “I’m not a fighter, I’m a lover”. I thoroughly enjoy experimenting with materials traditionally only used in conventional tackle to come up with new innovative fly patterns. There’s no doubt conventional lures are amazing fish catchers, and the way I look at this topic is very simple. If I can figure out a way to mimic the action or appeal that conventional lures have in my fly pattern designs, I’m going to gain a significant edge over fooling big educated fish. However, I do understand whether I like it or not, we’re going to have to draw the line at some point and define what classifies and distinguishes a fly from a lure. Thankfully for me, constantly evolving technology continues to open previously locked doors, and in turn, categorizes most of my creations as legitimate flies. Take spinner and propeller blades for instance. Henry Cowen’s Coyote striper fly uses a conventional blade in it’s design. It’s been accepted in the industry as a fly, and has also become one of the most popular searching patterns for striped bass and other warm water species. Montana Fly Company sells a streamer pattern called the Kingfisher’s … Continue reading

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Saturday Shoutout / Tim Romano Limited Edition Fishing Prints

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This Saturday’s Shoutout goes to Tim Romano and Midcurrent.com We’ve just been informed our good friend and very talented photographer Tim Romano will be selling some of his Limited Edition Fishing Photography Prints via Midcurrent.com. Depending on the demand and how many prints are sold, Romano will add additional prints to the online store, and we could even see additional photographers selling their prints on the Midcurrent website in the future. These Limited Edition Fishing Prints would make great holiday or birthday gifts for friends and family and they won’t break the bank at $35.00.     Click this link to view all prints for sale Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Been There, Felt That, and It Sucks

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You hook up with a trophy fish of a lifetime but your the natural high is extinguished quickly as it schools you…. Most of us have been there before and if you haven’t it’s just a matter of time. One of the best feelings in the world comes right after you set the hook and realize you have a trophy fish on the end of your line. On the other hand, one of the worst feelings in the world is having a trophy fish on, and losing it before you can net it. Sometimes it’s our fault while other times it’s simply bad luck, either way, it’s always heartbreaking. Since we always seem to showcase our wins, I thought it was only fare to post one of our losses. God knows we have plenty of them. This loss is provided by our good friend Charlie Murphy who feels numb and lifeless as he recalls play by play what went wrong during the fight of a steelhead well over thirty inches. Poor guy ran out of real estate as the fish hit fifth gear moving into water too deep to follow and rounding the bend breaking him off. Pulling a river runs through it floating down the river isn’t a viable option with single digit temperatures outside, but we gave him shit for not doing it anyway. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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My Grandfather’s Clinch Knot

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Do you think about tying your shoes, brushing your teeth, putting on your shirt? I’ll bet I’ve tied the Improved Clinch Knot more times than I’ve done any of those things. But I like to think that I pay more attention to my fishing knots than I do the knot in my shoe laces. When a long standing friend got into fly fishing and I started taking him out to show off a few of my favorite spots he was eager to learn everything about it. Including, of course, knots. Knots are one of those things that are handed down through oral tradition. These days you can go to YouTube and learn to tie any knot you want, but that’s not how I learned. Like most folks who have been fishing for a while I learned my knots from the guys I fished with, most importantly, my Grandfather. So when my friend Michael saw me tie my clinch knot, he saw me tie it the way my Grandfather had taught me. When I was done, he quizzed me, “how many wraps did you do?” “Six” I answered. “shouldn’t it be seven?”, he asked. “I’ve always done six” I replied “but I suppose seven is fine”. He was insistent, “the guy at the fly shop told me it has to be exactly seven”. There is an awful lot of superstition in fly fishing, but some things do matter and it got me wondering. I told the story to my buddy Dan who is a notorious big fish magnet. Before I could even ask him for his opinion he said, “well you can tell him five works just fine too”. Five? I admit I was a little surprised. If Dan was landing his fish on five wraps why was I wasting time … Continue reading

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What’s Correct, Left or Right Hand Retreive?

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I cast right handed so I should reel with my left hand right? Ask a saltwater guide and 95% of them will tell you the correct way is to always reel with your dominant hand. Ask a trout fisherman and most will say you should reel with the hand opposite your casting hand, because that way you don’t have to switch hands in the middle of fighting a fish to reel. I could go on and on arguing for both sides actually, but I think in the end it’s really a matter of personal preference. In my opinion, there’s no right or wrong way to reel as long as you’re able to get the job done on the water. I figured out a long time ago it would be beneficial for me to learn how to reel and fish effectively both ways. That way it would never be an issue when I was borrowing gear from a buddy, fishing the rod my guide has rigged up for me, or hitting the saltwater flats. It’s worked out great for me and I highly recommend others doing so. That being said, having sat here and pondered this subject for about an hour now, I decided to call a couple of my buddies in the industry to get their personal opinions. My first buddy works at one of the most prestigious fly shops in the country and he told me the left hand right hand debate, has become one of his biggest pet peeves. He says customers come into the shop all the time asking to get a reel spooled up and when he asks them if they want left or right hand retrieve, he often gets the answer, “Let me call my buddy and ask him what setup I should use”. My … Continue reading

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The Streamer Game

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Streamer fishing is addictive. It’s almost become a cliche, but it’s true. Guys get into it and hardly want to do anything else. I’m kinda one of those guys. I do lots of kinds of fishing, but if I’m out for trout and there’s nothing obvious going on, a streamer is likely what I’m tying on. I can’t say for sure why other folks get hooked on streamers, but I know what it is for me. Obviously, there is immense skill in fishing dry flies and nymphs. Each is an art unto itself but the very nature of a dead drift is inherently passive. Streamer fishing is active. What I mean by that is, you are directly imparting an action to the fly which fools the fish. For me, it just feels more personal. I am “making” that fish eat. Again, this is totally personal but when I see the fish chase and eat my streamer it’s incredibly rewarding. The really cool thing about this is that it leaves a lot of room for personal expression on the part of the angler. My action is my action, by my hand. It’s different from yours, and every dedicated streamer fisherman I know has their own style. Those styles vary widely, so I thought I would share some of the gear and tactics that are successful for me. Here’s how I play the game. I want to get in the fish’s face with a big fly that looks alive but vulnerable. I want that fly to look like a bait fish that’s disoriented and in a panic. I want a lot of room between me and the bank. I want to identify and hit multiple holding zones between me and the bank. I’ll drop my fly a few inches from the bank … Continue reading

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The Results Are In!

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The 2011 Gink and Gasoline Fly Fishing Photography Contest was a big success. We received so many great photos that we were overwhelmed, as were the judges. It’s exciting to see so many folks out there are so excited about sharing their experiences on the water. It was a tough choice but the judges have made their decisions and the results are as follows.   First Place and the Redington Sonic-Pro Stocking Foot Waders goes to, Jeff McDonald      Second Place and the Fishpond Piney Creek Tech Pack goes to, Chad Chorney.   Third Place and the Rio Gold fly line goes to Jeffrey Feczko. Congratulations to the winners! Again, let me say thanks to our Judges; Tim Romano, Claudia Lopez and Paul Puckett. And to our generous sponsors; Redington, Fishpond and Rio. And most of all to all of you who entered your awesome photos. There really were so many great entries. Click here to see them all!   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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