Should have brought the bamboo!

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Somethings in the air and it ain’t good. Brad Wayne rethinks his rod selection as storms roll through the Gros Ventre Valley. Graphite is a great conductor of electricity. Be careful out there. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com  

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Laying the Smack Down

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Sometimes you just have to lay the smack down on the water with your terrestrial fly patterns during the summer months to entice fish to eat. This trophy rainbow trout turned on our flies repeated times only to veer off at the last second. I changed flies and rigs multiple times and then this trout completely shut down on us. It wouldn’t budge even when the fly drifted the perfect line over the fish. I was about to give up when I told my client to scoot up a few feet closer and smack his dry fly down hard on the water right on the trout’s nose. He did so, and this big hen came up with no hesitation and inhaled his fly. It was a really cool fly fishing experience and my client was thrilled. Next time this summer you spot a trout and a regular drift doesn’t get the job done, try laying the smack down with your fly to imitate a bug flying into the water. Often it’s like ringing the dinner bell for trout. Check out this video link below of some epic terrestrial fishing on my home water, shot by Bent Rod Media. The giant fish at the end required a “Smack Down” to entice it to eat.   Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com  

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You want a piece of me?

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If you’re a permit, the answer is yes! This is what a permit sees when he comes up on a crab. The little guy waves those claws like a drunk in a bar fight because, well, that’s all he’s got. To a permit that’s the dinner bell. Keep that in mind at the vice when you’re working on that new crab pattern. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

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Casting Distance Does Play A Factor In Success

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Saltwater fly fishing often calls for long accurate casts for the chance of success, and quite often it holds just as true on your favorite trout streams. Of the countless hours I’ve spent guiding my trout clients the past ten years, I’ve witnessed over and over again, how important just a couple more feet of distance can be in getting a trout to eat. [image align=”right”] [/image] You just can’t always approach a hole and make a routine short cast. Often no matter how stealthy you are, you’ll spook the fish if you try getting closer. Occasionally, obstacles such as low hanging trees can make it impossible to get the proper casting angle unless your standing farther away. Other times you may run into a situation where different current speeds between you and your target require a longer cast to get an adequate drag free drift. That’s why it’s so important for fly anglers to get comfortable making above average casts. I’m not saying you have to be able to bomb out eighty feet of line, or that you’ll have to make super long casts all the time either. I’m just saying, there are times when you won’t be fishing that angler friendly pocket water that just calls for short roll casts and quick high-stick drifts. You need to be prepared to make longer casts when the need arises. Believe it or not, quite often trout will follow your flies down stream a good ways before deciding to eat. If your fly gets too close to you the trout will often see you and won’t eat. Making a longer presentation will provide that buffer zone for the trout to inspect and eat without seeing you. Remember that trout don’t have eyes in the back of their head as well. If … Continue reading

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A closer look. #1

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Fish, trout especially, are among the most beautiful creatures on earth. They are like swimming jewelry, and if you read that quote in John Gierach’s column, yes that was me. So from time to time I will offer you a closer look, and I can’t think of a better place to start on this Colorado rainbow than the fin that makes him a trout. The adipose fin is unique to Salmonids. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com  

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Respect Your Finned Friends with Proper C&R Practices

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Do your part by respecting your finned friends by practicing proper catch and release procedures. We’re in the second half of July already and whether you’re on the east coast or west coast, water temperatures are bound to be reaching harmful levels during the hottest times of the day on most watersheds. It’s really important after you land that trophy of a lifetime, that you take the time to ensure your catch is fully revived before releasing it. After all, oxygen levels are very low this time of year. Quite often I see anglers during the summer months release a trout right away after a long battle. Many anglers don’t realize that long fights build up toxic lactic acid in the fish, and can take it’s life if handled the wrong way.  A rule I live by guiding, is to revive the fish half as long as the fight time. Just because the fish kicks in your hands right off the bat doesn’t mean it’s really ready to be released. Hold on securely to the fish and point its nose directly upstream in moving water. This way it can have well oxygenated water pass over its gills. Make sure the fish can keep upright on its own and has good color before you fully release the fish. Doing so, you’ll be ensuring that trophy male or female will survive and pass on it’s great genetics during the next spawn. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

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The Holy Moses

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That day on the White River in AR Kent and I saw the biggest trout either of us had ever seen. I’m no gonna say how big because you won’t believe me, but this is the fly Kent tied that night and that should give you and idea. Authors Note: That bottle of Stranahan’s Whiskey was better than half full when we started tying. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

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The Early Bird Gets the Worm

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Here at Gink & Gasoline we believe strongly in the saying, “The early bird gets the worm”. Getting on the water early can pay off big time for two reasons. The first reason is you’ll often ensure your the first boat on the water, allowing you to present your fly first to fresh fish that haven’t put up their guard from previous fishermen. The second reason, which is our main reason for getting on the water early, is to take advantage of the great streamer fishing for wise trophy trout, that often prefer to feed during low light conditions. It’s easier for them to ambush prey and they also feel safer and more comfortable feeding during this time of the day. Pack your Advil, drink your water before bed to avoid the hangover, and hit the river early. Doing so you’ll often find your day of fishing will be more successful for big fish and numbers. Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

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Jeepers Creepers!

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Where’d you get those peepers? Andros Bonefish Ever wonder why it’s so hard to sneak up on a bonefish? Take a close look. Have you ever seen a fish with eyes like that? Notice how from straight above you can still see both eyes. That’s why he can see you. When you’re stalking the flats for these guys, here are a couple things to keep in mind: 1. Don’t wear bright colors. 2. Stay low when fish are close. 3. Don’t rock the boat or wade too quickly, making ripples in the water. 4. Lead the fish. Don’t show him your fly line. 5. Land the fly soft. He’s Watching.   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com

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Big Fish Require Slow Hook Sets On Top

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  If any of you have fished for cutthroat trout with dry flies you know most of the time you need to wait a good while on the hook set. The first time I fished for cutthroats I missed many more takes than I care to share. Cutthroat trout are known for their slow motion rises, and if you set the hook too quick, you’ll end up just pulling the fly out of the trout’s mouth. Just like cutthroat’s, big rainbow and brown trout also require you to count, 1 Mississippi, 2 Mississip…in your head before you set the hook to ensure consistent hook ups. If you can still see the fish eating your fly you need to wait longer. A big trout comes up, opens it bucket mouth, and usually doesn’t close it fully until it’s submerged completely below the surface. And if a fish is chasing after and eating your dry fly moving downstream, you have to wait even longer. Keep in mind also that the bigger your dry fly, the longer you need to wait on your hook set as well.  If your fishing a big size 4 extended body foam hopper, you’ll want to make sure the trout gets all of the fly in it’s mouth. Quick hook sets will often result in the fish just getting the tail end of the fly in its mouth or you’ll get what I call a hair lip hook up, that quickly results in a spit fly. Every angler no matter what their skill level, will end up setting the hook too quickly occasionally. Especially when trout catch you off guard when your scratching that nagging itch or looking at another trout rising. Just remember to give the big boys plenty of time to munch on your fly before … Continue reading

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