Saturday Shoutout / Out of Office

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The fly-fishing business is pretty unique. In most businesses, folks have their work, and then they have their passion. For folks in the fly fishing business, pretty much without exclusion, their work is their passion. It’s great to see companies put their work aside and just go fishing. In this video a group of hard working Orvis employees do just that. “Summer doesn’t last forever.” Ain’t that the truth. Out Of Office   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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New Orvis Clearwater Fly Rods: Video

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The new Orvis Clearwater fly rods offer an incredible fly fishing arsenal at a remarkable price.

Orvis has redesigned their Clearwater series rods for 2019. The old Clearwater rods were a pretty basic offering, with a uniform taper across the entire family. The new Clearwater rods have nothing in common with those older models, except the name and the great price. This new family of Orvis rods offers twenty-eight different models, ranging from a 7 1/2 foot 3 weight to a 15 foot 10 weight spey and even musky and euro-nymphing models. Each rod with a taper that’s fine tuned for specific performance. Best of all, these rods are affordable for anyone, ranging from $198 to $398.

WATCH THE VIDEO FOR ALL OF THE DETAILS ON THE NEW ORVIS CLEARWATER RODS.

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Spey Casting With The Non-Dominant Hand on Top

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By Jeff Hickman

SOMETIMES YOU LEARN SOMETHING VALUABLE COMPLEETLY BY ACCIDENT.
Last Summer I was on the phone with a good friend and regular client catching up. He was bummed to not be able to fish during his favorite Fall season due to a major shoulder surgery he had on his dominant right shoulder a few months previous. Extensive physical therapy was helping but he still had a lot of pain and his doctor suggested he hold off on fishing for several more months. Being the steelhead addict that he is, I knew that taking the season off would not be good for his mental health. So I told him to come out for a three day Deschutes camp trip and I would teach him to cast left handed which would give his right shoulder a much easier job.

He, like many guys that I fish with, had learned to Spey cast back in the days of the 14ft 9weight and Windcutter with unnecessary cheaters. This era of Spey fishing engrained many with a fast, erratic and borderline violent muscle memory. He had always struggled to sweep and cast slow enough for the modern short Scandinavian and Skagit heads to work properly. With his right hand on top, his fly needed frequent removal from the bushes behind him despite my nearly constant pleas for him to slow down.

So when he showed up for his trip he remained skeptical that he could learn to fish left handed or effectively fish without hurting his shoulder. But I made it very clear that he was to only fish left handed and he was not allowed to risk further injury by putting his right hand on top while casting. For backup, I claimed that his doctor had called me to make sure of this.

With no muscle memory with his left hand on top, I started my instruction from the ground up, walking him through the most important casting steps

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Flat Water Nymphing

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By Kent Klewein

Fishing nymphs in slow water is a different game.

The past few years, Louis and I have grown very fond of one specific pool tucked up in mountains of the southern appalachia. We visit it regularly because of the bounties of trout that it sustains and nurtures year round. We nicknamed it the “lazy boy pool”, because it constantly has food entering the pool and its slow moving water and deep water cover requires little energy for fish to feed round the clock. It’s loved by lazy trout and they in turn grow big and fat. Despite the large numbers of trout the pool holds, angler won’t find it to be a cake walk for catching them. To have success in this pool you have to bring your A-game. The fish have grown wise to fly anglers and the glass calm and crystal clear water adds further to the overall challenge. Trout here, get to examine your flies for long periods and they regularly dish out more refusals than eats. It’s had Louis and I pulling our hair out on multiple occasions. If we need our ego’s checked, this is the perfect place for us to do that. It never fails to reminds us we are far from having it all figured out. The slightest mistake by an angler will send wakes across the water alerting all the trout in the pool, and when that happens, the fish get lock jaw.

When you’re lucky you can get the fish to rise to dries at lazy boy pool, but it’s always hit or miss unless a hatch is in progress. The most success we’ve had fishing it has come from drifting nymphs subsurface. It’s not your average-Joe nymphing water though. It requires a niche nymphing techinque that I like to call “flat water nymphing”. Because the water moves so slow through the pool, bites can be very subtle and extremely hard to detect. Often the only signal of a bite

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Better Techniques for Tying Flies With Foam.

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By Bob Reece

Mid summer kicks off the season of foam for most of the trout fisheries that I frequent.

Foam patterns are a blast to fish. However, the process of tying with this buoyant material can produce frustration at the vise.

If I had to rank my techniques for working with foam, “pinch and cinch” would be at the top of my list. Foam can have a mind of its own. Attaching this springy material to the hook when and where a tier wants can be challenging. One key step to this is compressing the foam with your thumb and index finger when you take thread wraps around the material. This process results in tight wraps that hold the foam in its intended location. It also lowers the stress on the thread. This reduces the risk of breaking the thread or cutting the foam if a heavy gauge thread is being used.

When creating foam flies, I think of the process as sculpting. Foam’s pliable nature allows the tier to twist, stretch and bend it into the desired shape and position. By applying slight tension to the foam a thinner profile is created. A reduction in that tension allows the foam to return to its original dimensions.

The excess use of glue should never take the place of proficient tying techniques. Yet, when tying with foam super glue in is essential element of long lived patterns. Foam is a smooth and slippery material. This property causes it to rotate and slide on the hook shank without the presence of glue. As a result of this, I always

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One Fly, One Cast, One Tarpon

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The bow of the skiff rises and falls under my feet as my eyes scan the vast expanse of blue and green.

We call this riding the bull. Balancing on a casting platform as the boat bobs and shifts in the surf. Out on the ocean side, that’s where you find migrating tarpon. These big fish push past in schools, often single file. It’s challenging fishing and today has been no exception. We’ve seen plenty of fish and plenty of refusals and disappearing acts but no open mouths or flared gill plates.

It’s late on the second day of fishing. We haven’t seen a fish in a while and haven’t fed one all day. My buddy Johnny Spillane and I each put a couple of nice fish in the air the day before, in spite of poor light. We had great expectations when we saw the beautiful blue sky this morning. Neither of us, or our guide Capt. Jessie Register, have an explanation for the attitude the fish are giving us, except that they are tarpon and that’s what they do.

A little red catamaran is cooking up the beach straight for us. It’s up on one hull and the guy is leaning out over the side. As he gets close, we are all wondering if we should be panicking. It really does look like he’s going to T-bone the skiff. It occurs to me that we are all watching the sailboat bearing down on us and that’s exactly the time a nice fish would swim by. I make a quick scan and, sure enough, there she is at two o’clock, and she’s big.

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Sunday Classic / 3 Things I Learned By Not Catching A Permit

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I AM NOT A MASTER PERMIT FISHERMAN. I THINK THAT’S EXACTLY THE THING I ENJOY ABOUT IT.
I like the challenge and if you’re looking for a challenge, permit have one for you. While I don’t consider myself an expert on the subject, I am learning and that puts me in a great position to share what I learn. Even if I am learning from my mistakes.

I had a great shot at a permit the other day and I totally screwed it up. Here’s what happened.

I was fishing with friends Joel Dickey and Rob Kramarz, both experienced flats guides. I was on the bow and we were fishing the early part of a falling tide. At twelve o’clock to the boat there was a cut in a small key and we anticipated that permit might be coming out with the tide.

As we poled slowly toward the mouth of the cut, I caught movement in my peripheral vision and turned to find a fish coming straight for the boat at two o’clock. It was an odd looking fish. Too light in color to be a permit and too dark to be a bonefish. As I struggled to identify it, the fish

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Saturday Shoutout / Chandalar

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A beautiful example of the healing power of fly-fishing.

This remarkable film, from the folks at Simms and Soul River, follows fourteen young people and five U.S. veterans as they float the Chandalar river in Alaska. They learn to row, to fly fish, and to thrive with PTSD.

“This is a story of how U.S Veterans can change lives and find purpose by volunteering their time. The participants come from different worlds and while they know that their experience with trauma is what initially binds them together, it isn’t what defines them.”

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The Fish Of A Lifetime: Video

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What happens when the fish of a lifetime refuses your fly three times?

If you are Jack Stephens, and you’ve spent half a century looking for a river no one has fished, and you’ve found it…you cast again. This is an amazing fishing story, and all caught on film. The kind of magic that only happens in Patagonia.

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Lighting The Way

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By Bob Reece

I leaned forward to check the UV coat that I had just applied to my finished fly.

The quick searing pain in my fore head reminded me that I had come too far. This was the last straw for me, the desk lamp that I had owned since college was on its way out. Along with its propensity to heat up, I had no idea how much my favorite lamp was adversely impacting the quality of my tying.

Having quality lighting at your fly tying station is essential for making the most of your time. Since my sentimental departure with my first tying light, I’ve embraced the use of natural spectrum lights. The two lights that I currently tie with are produced by the Ott Light company. The larger desk top model uses a bulb. Conversely the smaller and more portable model uses LED lighting. Both lights produce almost no heat.

More importantly than the reduction of heat is what these lights do for the eyes of tier. Fly tying is one of the most strenuous activities with regard to eye strain. Tying lights that produce light within the natural spectrum greatly reduce this stress. This helps to create a more positive tying experience and also allows for longer tying sessions.

In addition to a lack ocular discomfort, this genre of lights helps the tier to more accurately see the colors of the materials that they are using. That accuracy can

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