A Closer Look

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In honor of fall here’s a closer look at male Southern Appalachian Brook Trout in spawning colors.  This little guy is clearly a mature adult at four inches long.  Perfect. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Peacock Bass In The Amazon, Part 2

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Packing for Success in the Amazon Preparing and packing the right gear prior to your departure to the Amazon is crucial for your overall trip enjoyment and fishing success. Following these gear recommendations, fishing tips, and general amazon facts, will ensure that you’ll be ready to tackle the monster peacock bass you’ll encounter as well as the hot tropical climate. One important factor that rookie amazon anglers often fail to realize is water levels on the rivers and tributaries of the Amazon River can make or break your trip. Sometimes conditions will be perfect a week or two before your departure, and a couple days before your scheduled to leave, you’ll receive an updated water level report informing you that conditions have deteriorated. It’s just part of the game. It comes with fishing a river that provides us with 1/5 the worlds freshwater supply. Talk to any veteran peacock bass angler and they’ll quickly tell you how big a role water levels play in the fishing and how helpless you are at controlling them. Despite there being both wet and dry fishing seasons in the Amazon, sometimes the seasons end up being the opposite of what they should be for the time of the year. Your best bet for coping with this uncertainty is booking your trip with the right Amazon outfitter or lodge. The, fly fishing only, Agua Boa Lodge, located in Brazil, is best suited for coping with both high and low water levels because of its specialized equipment, exclusive location, and the diversified fishing operations. Water Levels are Important in the Amazon If water levels are too high, peacock bass often will move back into the flooded jungle shorelines making them difficult to coax out or present a fly to. On the flip side of the coin, … Continue reading

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South Andros, A Love Story

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I love the Bahamas. It hits me about this time every year. Just about the time I start pulling out the polar fleece and looking for my fishing gloves I start thinking about Andros. I love the cold weather, it’s not that, it’s just become a rhythm for me. This is the time of year I start thinking about bonefish and gully wash (the coconut milk rum and gin based fire water the locals drink). I start to crave conch salad and that sweet Bahamian bread.                      I think about warm breezes and cool sand when I should be thinking about migrating brown trout. I start checking over my bonefish gear when I should be prepping my Spey set up. I find myself looking at the weather for Andros when I should be planning my steelhead trips. I think about my friends there at Andros South and the friends I’ve made fishing there who live all over. Some of them even get a phone call. “Hey, what’s up? Done any good fishing lately? Going to the Bahamas this year?”. The other day I even bought a bunch of saltwater tying material. You never know, right? I got some leader material too. Better safe than sorry. It’s almost November and I’m making rum drinks while all my friends are settling into dark winter beers. I imagine they talk about me behind my back like I was a fool hopelessly in love with a girl who doesn’t know he exists. “Wake up dreamer, it’s not gonna happen”. Well, the world needs dreamers. I’m booking my ticket tonight. Try not to hate me. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Fly Fishing For Peacock Bass, Part 1

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I’ve been very blessed to have fly fished many destinations around the world. All have been amazing trips, but one destination in particular I hold close to my heart. Every time someone asks me what’s the coolest place I’ve fly fished, without any hesitation, I always reply fly fishing for peacock bass in the Amazon. Combine the extreme beauty and remoteness of the Amazon Basin with the opportunity to battle one of the most powerful freshwater gamefish on the planet, and it’s pretty easy to see why it ranks at the top of my list. That’s not even factoring in the other bonuses you’ll receive, like catching several other species of fish and witnessing all the diverse wildlife. “While beginners always seem to catch fish, the persistent skilled angler wielding a precise cast is more often than not rewarded for his/her hard won mastery. Make a good sidearm cast between two logs under a tree and it might be rewarded. Hit that bit of flashing neon green or quickly reload to hit a laid-up chunk of muscle and madness 20 feet off the boat’s bow and it just might work. Peacock bass fishing is intriguing fishing. It is shoulder burning, forearm aching and finger cramping to be sure. There will be snags hooked, lines fouled and fish missed. It is at times maddening, frustrating and patience testing, but ultimately exhilarating, very satisfying and all consuming…and yes, as cliched as it might sound, addicting.” Scott Heywood Making a trip to the Amazon used to be one of the most economical international fishing trips you could book at a very reasonable $2995, for a week of fishing and lodging. But with the falling US Dollar and economic turmoil we’ve been dealt the last several years, the cost has almost doubled. But in … Continue reading

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The Grandbaby

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Up in the North Georgia hills up past Suches, up about Hells Holler and Devils Den they tell a story. They say that when the leaves turn the color of blood and the moon hangs like a old orange pumpkin in the sky and a cold wind blows down out of Big Frog, an age old ritual comes to pass. The elders take the youngest of the clan and dress them in their finest denim and trucker hats and lead them down out of the hills. Down to where the water runs cold and deep. Down in the shade of the ironwood tree. Down by the big rock at the bend in the river with worms and crickets and then there’s blood. Lots of blood. That’s when it does its worst. The Grandbaby.  Happy Halloween From G&G! Seriously guys, teach your kids that it’s more fun to release a fish than to kill it. And if you want to read something really scary, check out Kent’s story on the death of the Toccoa River in Southern Culture on the Fly. The new issue launches tomorrow!   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com  

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Sunday Classic / Big Fish Require Slow Hook Sets On Top

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  If any of you have fished for cutthroat trout with dry flies you know most of the time you need to wait a good while on the hook set. The first time I fished for cutthroats I missed many more takes than I care to share. Cutthroat trout are known for their slow motion rises, and if you set the hook too quick, you’ll end up just pulling the fly out of the trout’s mouth. Just like cutthroat’s, big rainbow and brown trout also require you to count, 1 Mississippi, 2 Mississip…in your head before you set the hook to ensure consistent hook ups. If you can still see the fish eating your fly you need to wait longer. A big trout comes up, opens it bucket mouth, and usually doesn’t close it fully until it’s submerged completely below the surface. And if a fish is chasing after and eating your dry fly moving downstream, you have to wait even longer. Keep in mind also that the bigger your dry fly, the longer you need to wait on your hook set as well.  If your fishing a big size 4 extended body foam hopper, you’ll want to make sure the trout gets all of the fly in it’s mouth. Quick hook sets will often result in the fish just getting the tail end of the fly in its mouth or you’ll get what I call a hair lip hook up, that quickly results in a spit fly. Every angler no matter what their skill level, will end up setting the hook too quickly occasionally. Especially when trout catch you off guard when your scratching that nagging itch or looking at another trout rising. Just remember to give the big boys plenty of time to munch on your fly before … Continue reading

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Saturday Shoutout / Bring It On Home

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This week, two very different perspectives, on two very different homes and some exceptional writing. “In the Impressionist Wing”,  from Mysteries Internal.  Erin Block, a wonderful writer, on becoming a mountain woman.   “Lights Go Out On A Fly Fish Frat House”  Lo Fi Fly, on the end of all good things.  Makes me sad I missed it!   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com  

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What The Hell Is That?

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Every once in a while you see something you just can’t explain. I was shooting in the Florida Keys the other day with with my friend Capt. Joel Dickey. It was late in the day. The sun was hanging right on the horizon and I was making the best of the evening light. I was out of the boat, standing in wast deep water shooting Sandy Horn casting from the bow and Joel on the platform when Joel called out “we got a school of perms coming, big school”. I stayed still and quiet, excited about the chance to shoot a hookup from out of the boat. I could see the push about a hundred and fifty yards out. Joel wasn’t kidding about it being a big school. The push looked like the wake of a flats boat. Our setup couldn’t have been better. The push was headed straight for us and fast. I could see Joel squinting into the glare. At a hundred yards he said, “no, it’s not permit”. A minute later, in a very different tone of voice he said,”oh my God that’s a f¥€king huge shark”. Now, I have heard these words before and I have seen sharks in the Keys bigger than a flats boat. You don’t have to say f¥€king huge shark to me twice. I made a little wake of my own getting back to the boat. By this time the push was fifty yards away and closing fast. You could see the water parting off the dorsal fin. I thought about saying, “we’re gonna need a bigger boat”. Before I could it dawned on all of us that we should be able to see a fish that big by now, but we couldn’t. We could just see the push. “It must be … Continue reading

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Why Can’t There Be Heated Fly Rods

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I’ve got a special request for Santa Claus this year. Bring me my very own, one of a kind, heated fly fishing rod, damn it! I’m fed up with having to de-ice my guides every other cast during the winter. And how nice would it be to have a heated handle to hold onto all day, to help keep the dexterity in your fingers. Come on, I know I’m not the only person out there that would love to see this become reality. My good friend Murphy a.k.a. Charlie Murphy, brought this ridiculous but legitimate request to my attention. This guy is so hardcore, he’ll throw rocks into a river frozen over, to break holes so he can cast a fly into them. After talking on the phone about the idea, we both agreed we had to find out the scoop to see if a heated fly rod existed. Murphy volunteered to do some research and here’s what he found. In 1995, someone actually invented and patented, a heated fishing rod.  It’s not a fly rod but damn close, and I’m sure it could be tweaked so a one piece fly rod design would work.. Click the Photos for a larger view, or you can click the link to visit a full size .pdf document of the U.S. Patent.      Heated Fishing Rod – US Patent Maybe we’ll get lucky and one of the fly rod companies out there will read this post and get inspired. I know one thing, if a rod company did manage to bring the heating element to the table, I bet just about every fly fisherman would purchase one. I know I would, hell I’d purchase four at least. That way I’d finally be able to convince my clients to come fishing with me … Continue reading

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Romano On The Rocks

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Tim Romano scampers across these boulders along the Colorado River like a kid playing hop scotch. It almost killed me keeping up with him. Tim told me a story about a moose that chased him down that canyon. Glad it wasn’t there that day. I’d have died.   Tim is an ubertalented phtotgrapher and blogs for Field and Stream and Angling Trade. Check him out.   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com  

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