Sunday’s Classic / Fly Fishing For Peacock Bass Part 1

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I’ve been very blessed to have fly fished many destinations around the world. All have been amazing trips, but one destination in particular I hold close to my heart. Every time someone asks me what’s the coolest place I’ve fly fished, without any hesitation, I always reply fly fishing for peacock bass in the Amazon. Combine the extreme beauty and remoteness of the Amazon Basin with the opportunity to battle one of the most powerful freshwater gamefish on the planet, and it’s pretty easy to see why it ranks at the top of my list. That’s not even factoring in the other bonuses you’ll receive, like catching several other species of fish and witnessing all the diverse wildlife. “While beginners always seem to catch fish, the persistent skilled angler wielding a precise cast is more often than not rewarded for his/her hard won mastery. Make a good sidearm cast between two logs under a tree and it might be rewarded. Hit that bit of flashing neon green or quickly reload to hit a laid-up chunk of muscle and madness 20 feet off the boat’s bow and it just might work. Peacock bass fishing is intriguing fishing. It is shoulder burning, forearm aching and finger cramping to be sure. There will be snags hooked, lines fouled and fish missed. It is at times maddening, frustrating and patience testing, but ultimately exhilarating, very satisfying and all consuming…and yes, as cliched as it might sound, addicting.” Scott Heywood Making a trip to the Amazon used to be one of the most economical international fishing trips you could book at a very reasonable $2995, for a week of fishing and lodging. But with the falling US Dollar and economic turmoil we’ve been dealt the last several years, the cost has almost doubled. But in … Continue reading

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Saturday’s Shoutout / The Rusty Spinner

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This weeks Saturday Shoutout goes to  The Rusty Spinner blog. I’ve really enjoyed following this well written and entertaining blog lately. It covers a wide range of fly fishing topics and it’s generally updated with regular posts throughout the week. I really like that it’s a breeze to read, yet the information is emotionally deep. More times than not the content hits home with me on a personal level, and that’s not always the case traveling throughout the blogosphere. Check it out when you get a chance. Below are a few of my favorite posts on The Rusty Spinner the last couple weeks: Blogging and Fishing The Flat When Choosing Friends Keep it Reel, Kent Klewein Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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A Closer Look / The Dreaded Lionfish

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Exotic, Poisonous, the mother of all invasive species but they sure are pretty.   Read why you should kill this beautiful creature on sight!   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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10 Tips to Keep You Catching Fish During Your Fly Fishing Travels

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It’s easy to get out of your game when you’re traveling and fly fishing a new piece of water. It has happened to me plenty of times, where I find myself fly fishing and going against all my fishing catching principles. Stick to what works for you on your home water and keep your confidence, and you’ll be landing beautiful fish in no time. Below are ten principles that I always make sure I live by when I’m fly fishing abroad on unfamiliar waters. 1. Spend your time fishing productive water, don’t waist your time fishing subpar water. 2. Look for the 3 C’s (Cover, Current, Cusine) to locate the hotspots. 3. Always position yourself where you can get your best presentation and drift. 4. Have your fly rig setup correctly for the water you’re fishing (nymph rig set correctly, long enough leader for spooky risers, correct tippet size, ect). 5. Take the time to figure out the food source the fish are keying in on. Take regular bug samplings throughout the day and keep an eye out for aquatic insects on the water. 6. Always fish with confidence and fish hard. Persistence usually pays off. 7. Don’t be afraid to move on if the water your fishing is slow. Even pack up and change watersheds if fishing conditions are bad enough. Its saved me on many fishing trips. 8. Do your research before you leave on your fishing trip. Don’t be afraid to hire a guide the first day so you can get dialed-in and understand how to fish the water correctly. 9. Pack your fly tying materials and vise with you. You never know when you’ll run out of the hot fly pattern or need to tie up a pattern you don’t have in your fly box. 10. … Continue reading

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Fighting Big Bonefish

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We’ve talked about casting to bonefish in a variety of conditions. We’ve talked about the propped retrieve to get the fish to eat. Now that your hooking up with all of these big bones owe buddy Bruce Chard is back with some advice on fighting bonefish. Check out the video and Bruce will show you how to get that fish to the boat as efficiently as possible. If you missed Bruce’s earlier bone fishing posts, check them out now. Better Posture For Line Speed Snap Your Wrist For Line Speed The V-Grip The Belgian Cast Better Bonefish Retrieve Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Carp on the Fly – 12 Q&A’s to Get You Ready

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Good friend and fly fishing guide, Ryan Dunne has been capitalizing on the growing carp buzz by fly anglers lately. Ryan commented, “I’ve seen a significant increase in carp fishing inquiries the last two years, and when the dog days of summer arrive and the trout fishing bite goes south, I now opt for poling my skiff and guiding my clients to carp on my local rivers and lakes”. Thank you Ryan for taking the time to sit down with Gink & Gasoline to answer twelve frequently asked questions about fly fishing for carp. Have you found certain colors of fly patterns to be more effective than others? I find that the water conditions and ambient light conditions dictate which color is more effective. I typically stick to four different colors when tying carp flies. They are black, brown, olive, and orange. Although the majority of my flies are tied in the aforementioned colors, I do tie with other colors as well. Have you found certain fly tying materials (synthetics or natural) that carp seem to dislike? I haven’t noticed a difference in carp behavior towards either type of material. However, most of my fly patterns contain a combination of both synthetic and natural fly tying materials. What are a couple of your favorite go-to carp flies? My two favorite patterns are the Carp Carrot and Carp Dragon. Is the weight of your fly patterns critical and if yes, when do you prefer heavier flies? Weight is definitely a key part to my subsurface carp patterns. Feeding carp rarely stay in one place, so you want to get your fly in the feeding zone as quick as possible. Water depth will dictate the weight of my patterns. I find that bead-chain and dumbbell eyes in various sizes are ideal for … Continue reading

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Guide Dos And Don’ts

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I fully expect to catch some heat for this. When I wrote the list of client dos and don’ts I quoted my friend Kirk and agreed whole heartedly with the glowing things he had to say about fishing guides. I took that one step farther by emailing a bunch of my friends who guide and putting together a list of the stuff they would like to tell their clients but don’t feel like they can. I’m sure there were some things on that list a lot of guys didn’t want to hear so, in the interest of fair play, today the guides get their list of dos and don’ts. I fully expect to catch some heat for this, so please try to understand where it’s coming from. I’m a big fan of fishing guides. As I’ve said most of my friends are fishing guides and I have a great deal of respect for the men and women who do that job. I will quote Kirk Deeter again, “I think the sun rises and sets on the fly fishing world where guides collectively say it does. They are stewards of their rivers. They are the innovators, and the teachers. And a good guide is, for fly fishing and trout conservation, worth his or her weight in gold.” I have however fished with guides who were less than stellar, for one reason or another. Since I did a list of dos and don’ts for clients, it seems only fair to do the same for guides. I expect most of the guides who read this will agree with what I have to say. Most of it is very obvious and simple. If you do not, I encourage you to look at it from the other side of the boat. I’ve seen everything on … Continue reading

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Sunday Classic / Shoot Raw Files

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Here’s another tip for the shutter bugs. Most cameras default to shooting a jpeg file. Jpeg files are great for looking at on your computer, sending in email, posting on the web and even for casual prints. But if your camera has a raw file setting, there is a whole world of rich color and contrast control at your fingertips. Raw files are intimidating for most people and with good reason. You will need special software to process these files before you can really do anything with them and this will require an investment of money and time. But if you really want to take your photography to the next level, raw files are a valuable tool. I don’t usually recommend specific products or brands but I feel so strongly about Adobe’s Lightroom application that, in this case, I am going to say you should seriously consider it. I know of nothing on the market that comes close for processing raw files. I’ll take a break on photo tips now. If you want more, let me know. Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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Saturday Shoutout / 3 Worth a Read

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Here’s your spring reading list for 2012. Three great pieces from three great writers.   Bonefish on the Brain Know Thyself Bjorn Stromsness writes about his doubts as an angler in this wonderfully honest piece. This is an exercise we should all undertake. Thanks Bjorn! Nicely done.   The Fishing Poet The Gift of Memory Matt Smythe receives a posthumous gift of a fly rod from his Grandmother. A touching reminder of those loved and lost. Mysteries Internal Songs in the Dark and a Stonefly The final chapter in Erin Block’s bamboo rod saga…or is it? I have really enjoyed reliving the thrill of the first bamboo rod through Erin’s writing. Thanks Girl!   Louis Cahill Gink & Gasoline www.ginkandgasoline.com hookups@ginkandgasoline.com   Sign Up For Our Weekly Newsletter!  

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RS2 – One of My Favorite Picky Trout Fly Patterns

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There’s days when trout fishing is so slow, it seems like conditions couldn’t possibly get any worse. You may find yourself questioning if any trout in the stream are willing to feed at all. At other times, you’ll have no problem locating pods of steady risers, but everything you throw at them is rejected. My buddy Brad in this situation usually volunteers to row the boat, opting for cold beer within arms distance and gazing at picturesque landscapes. The dude always has a Plan B ready to be put into action, ensuring he always has a good time on the water whether he catches fish or just a buzz, and I respect that. The RS2 fly pattern time and time again never fails to produce for me during tough fishing situations. And it really has the ability to catch fish just about any way you fish it. Fish it solo on fine tippet to wary sippers and you’ll fool a couple guaranteed. Drop it off the back of a larger and more visible dry fly if you’re having problems seeing it, and it will ride in the film, usually fooling fish on even the most technical trout water. I even have great luck fishing an RS2 as my dropper fly in a tandem nymph rig dredging along the bottom of the stream. Thank you Rim Chung for inventing this dynamite fly pattern. Primarily, the RS2 was created as a baetis emerger imitation that would ride in the surface film, but tie it small enough, and it can also work very well imitating midges. Do me a favor and next time you’re getting your butt handed to you on the water, tie on an RS2 and see if you can’t turn your luck around. Rim Chung’s website and RS2 Tying Instructions Keep … Continue reading

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